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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  January 12, 2018 2:07am-3:58am EST

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the rules. >> neighbors tell me the family that lives in this home was sound asleep when the mudslide hit. their children's room is right there. boulders smashed through the wall. fortunately, everyone survived. but jeff, many people still haven't been allowed back in the area to see what's left of their homes. >> carter evans, thank you very much. on the subject of the children today. the santa barbara county sheriff's released the names of 17 who diechltd four children. the youngest three. oldest victim was 89. now just one year after being sworn in, governor gre tich ton, find himself under siege. >> there is big news from the nation's largest private employ year. >> no matter how much pain he was in never showed it. >> the 6-year-old is recovering after the texas church massacre. the man who saved him, helped
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>> i said when you are ready to leave here i will get my
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a disturbing video we first showed you last night has gone viral now. it shows hospital staffers in baltimore, dropping off a discharged patient on a cold city street. today the hospital apologized. jeff pegue. s has our update. >> so you are okay with leaving that woman out there like that? >> in the video. four hospital security guards are seen pushing a red wheelchair away from a bus stop. a that just left this patient in the freezing temperatures. all she had on was a hospital gown and socks. >> you are going to leave this lady out here with no clothes on. >> you were in this area when you started recording. >> yes, actually just n
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that lamp post. >> manu baracka was recording with his cell phone. >> in the heart of downtown baltimore, ♪ ♪ clothing on. vulnerable. fully ex-please posed literally. >> go ahead and sit down. >> today the university of maryland medical center, apologized and promise aid thorough investigation. >> are you sure this is an isolated case. >> we feel comfortable in the statement that what you saw on the video is not -- is not a process that, that would occur with any frequency at all. >> there is no national data base that tracks so-called patient dumping incidents. they occur because a patient lacks insurance or financial resources. >> minimum requirement. >> katherine layman with u.s. commission on civil rights.% >> what i see from that video is a person who was not stablized. is a person who needed
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hospital needed to do. >> to protect her privacy we are not identifying the patient. but, in a face book post her mother said, that that strid yo was horrifying. she says that her daughter is with family and will be getting medical treatment not here, but at another medical facility. jeff. >> jeff pegues staying on the storien baltimore. jeff, thank you. >> congress is trying to reach a deal by the end of next week to extend the obama era daca program. it allows immigrants who are brought illegally into the u.s. as children to live and work without fear of deportation. nearly 100 immigrants with daca status are currently enrolled in medical schools. adriana diaz sat down with a group of them. >> every tim i hear footsteps outside my door, a part of me thinks should i open the door. >> even after 20 years in the u.s., caesar montelanga worries about being deported. third year medical
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in mexico but raised in new mexico is afraid without daca he may never be able to practice legally. >> we will be forever stuck with this status that makes us essentially like second-class citizens. >> this woman, fled violence in mexico at 14 wants to be an obgyn. >> the news reminds you, twitter remind you that, at some level you are not welcomed here. >> i see the u.s. as my home. my community. my people. my peers. >> this woman's mother brought her to the u.s. illegally from guatemala when she was 7. >> i feel like i haven't done anything wrong. i have gone to school. i have gotten good grade. i do community service. yet, that gives me no right in a sense. >> what do you say to folks who, say, this is a country that has to have its borders has to have its laws and people have to follow those laws? >> if you had someone that, yes they enter the country
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illegally, 20, 30 years ago, and they're a pro duck tough member of the community, paying taxes, what is the logic behind deporting them outside of just falling an arbitrary rule. >> i've have to go, i wouldn't go to mexico. i would go to europe or canada or any other country that wants doctors. at the end of the day, we're american trained, almost physicians. any other country would jump up to take any of us. >> the students say they're anxiously counting down the days until their daca protection expires. meantime, they and the medical school here are lobbying law makers to find a long term solution. jeff. >> adriana, thank you. weeks after russian president vladamir putin all but declared victory in syria, russia's main military base in syria was attacked last weekend by mysterious swarm of drones. charlie d'agata looked into this. until now rebel groups in syria have used remote
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drones like the ones in the propaganda videos to drop bombs on targets. so now, picture 10 drones all together all weaponized all headed to the same target. the russian defense ministry said it suffered the first mass attack by drones, guided by a gps system, at its base in northwestern syria. another three, targeted its naval base at tartis. seven drones shot down. remaining ones were electronically jammed and forced to land. neither base suffered any cas l casualtie casualties. the russians released these pictures today showing what they recovered. attack drones. partly made of wood, and held together with masking tape. a deadly mix of low and high tech, according to former british army weapons expert, pete norton. >> this particular attack is the number of drones involved against a single target. the fact that they have been launched on what appears to be completely autonomous mission. >> these drones can carry up to asy
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have a longer range. more than 60 miles. the russians claim that only countries with high tech capabilities could have supplied the materials but didn't specify any country. our weapons expert told us, all of the materials are readily available on the market. jeff. >> charlie d'agata. thank you. now to other stories we are following in the evening news feed. u.s. service member was wounded in a possible insider attack in eastern afghanistan. the taliban claimed it was carried out by two insurgents disguised as local is militiamen. friendly off to the u.s. at least seven u.s. troops were killed in the same region last year. the fbi today released age progressed photos of four men wanted for the hijacking of pan am flight 73 back in 1986, showing what they might look like now. they boarded that plane in pakistan, after a standoff murdered at least 20 people including two americans. they serve
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pakistan but were set free without facing justice in the u.s. five women are now accusing actor james franco of sixable misconduct. "los angeles times" reports four were students at his acting school. franco denies the allegations. he within ape best actor award sunday at the golden globes among those wearing a time's up pin supporting a hollywood initiative against the abuse of power by men. >> the cbsover will be right back. (alex trebek) $8,000. over $8,000. now, why is this number so important? because $8,508 is the average cost of a funeral. if you've already planned how to help cover your final expenses, like this one, great. but if you haven't, i'm here to tell you about the number one most popular whole life insurance plan
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prosecutor in st. louis opened an investigation into the governor. he admits he cheated on his wife denies accusation he's tried to blackmail his mistress. there are calls for the governor's resignation. >> i am a navy seal. i will take dead aim at politics. >> reporter: campaigned as an outsider, a family man. most importantly i am a proud husband and father. first time candidate, eric greittens, appealed to a cross section of vote is with his brains, and brawn. now, just one year after being sworn in, governor greittens find himself under siege. audio recordings from
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afill yfiliat affiliate, kmov, cbs has not independently verified appear to show an unnamed woman, the governor's alleged hairdresser admitting a consensual sexual encounter with a governor to her then husband. the alleged blackmail threat she said that scared her. >> while acknowledging the affair, the show me state governor denies all other accusations. saying show me the proof. we have not been
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nothing about the circumstances of how or why it was made. >> in a separate statement first lady sheena greittens has forgiven her husband. said we have a loving marriage and awesome family. anything beyond that is between us and god. as for the woman on the tape, the former hairdresser, she has not commented publicly. and according to our st. louis affiliate was not aware at the type that her ex-husband was recording her confession. jeff. >> thank you very much. >> up next here tonight. attention wal-mart workers, you could be getting a raise. and a bonus. jack and jill went up the hill to fetch a pail of water. all because of a burst water pipe in their house that ruined the hardwood floors in their kitchen.
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out... to help animate lifeless hair, and bring it back to life. find aahs and oos in every fresh bottle of herbal essences bio:renew. let life in. wal mar-mart its boogs in minimum wage and giving bonuses of $1 t the largest private employer said it is closing 60 of the sams club stores across the country. some went out of business today. workers didn't find out until they showed up and found the doors locked. >> a woman in virginia thought you would look to see this video of her husband slipping down the driveway the other day. so she posted it online. it's now been moved more than 44 million times. he its
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wife said she is okay. but says she can't stop laughing. who is on thin ice now? up
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we end with a little buy who got the ride of his life today. omar vilafranca was there. >> reporter: dozens of people gathered on the south texas highway for ryan moore's homecoming. that's him in the front of the firetruck. he isn't just any
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home. >> he is our hero. he is the reason that we stay positive through all of this. >> today is special because for the last two months, ryland was living in a south texas hospital. last november, a gunman attacked his church in suterland springs, texas. 26 people were killed that morning. ryland was shot five times. his stepmother, joanne died shielding the boy. his two sisters brook and emily didn't make it. >> i was, rusty duncan is a stockdale volunteer fire fighter and responded to the shooting. inside the church ryland was the first person he noticed. >> i felt there was something holding my pant leg. look down a little arm. so i, i, picked him up. and, and, carried him outside right away. >> rusty would visit ryland in the hospital all most every sunday. the visits kept ryland's spirits up. >> he is very energetic. no matter how much pain he was in, he never showe
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>> when ryland learned he would finally be going home, he wanted to go in style. luckily, he had a new friend with a pretty sweet ride. >> he asked me to go faster. he asked me to, to, if the siren could be any louder. and he wanted me to blow the horn more. ryland is finally home. he still has a mom, a dad, and a sister. and he still has got a long road to recovery. but residents of this small south texas town say they will be with ryland for every step. that is the "overnight news" for this friday.
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>> announcer: this is the cbs "overnight news." hi, welcome to the "overnight news," i'm demarco morgan. hope is beginning to fade in southern california, where rescue teams are still clawing through debris searching for survivors of the devastating mudslide. montecito hardest hit when boulders, trees came crashing through homes and businesses. carter evans begins our coverage. >> as new images of harrowing rescues. and escapes emerge from across southern california. the clean-up continues. the massive mud, vehicles and debris is slowly being cleared from montecito neighborhood and highways. today the search-and-rescue mission looks more like a
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crews found a body in this home. as the victim's family stood by. the floodwater was so powerful when it rushed down randall road here it wiped out almost every single home on this block. these houses are worth upward of $3 million. now they're unrecognizable. here is what it looked like from above. before the flood. these are the boulders that came rolling down the mountain with floodwaters. there was nothing that could stop them. you can see where they blew through the wall of this home. >> we heard this monstrous sound that was like a fratd train. carrie tide was trapped in her home and says she never got a mandatory evacuation order. >> we couldn't go anywhere. meanwhile we were seeing people rescued off the roofs. of houses that were just a few doors down.
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warned residents days ahead of the storm. including tweets, saying that flash flooding and debris flows were imminent. but the department hesitated to use a cell phone emergency alert system. they reportedly waited until 3:50 a.m. tuesday morning to push out the alert. roughly 10 minutes ahead of the worst flooding. telling the l.a. times heap waited because if you cry wolf, people stop listening. >> we would have evacuated. everybody in my neighborhood would have. we all are families. we have kids. and, and if that was -- dictated to us, we would have followed the rules. >> neighbors tell me the family that lives in this home was sound asleep when the mudslide hit. their children's room is right there. boulders smashed through the wall. fortunately, everyone survived. but jeff, many people still haven't been allowed back in the area to see what's left of their homes. there is more severe weather on the horizon. meteorologist eric fisher with your overnight news forecast. >> pretty nasty, complicated storm system developing. a big pull of mild air.
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we'll be watching heavy rainfall in the warmer side of the storm. that warmer side of storm. but a band of snow and ice that sets up on the cold side of the storm, especially across ohio, kentucky, into parts of pennsylvania, new york. northern new england before all moves off the new england coast as we head into saturday. when it comes to snowfall, the highest totals expected to be across western into central new york where we may see up to a foot. the big story though is a dramatic drop in temperatures. st. louis hit 65. noon today t it is 35 now. it will be 15 come tomorrow morning. you can see that nice edge of colder air, racing off to the east. all the spots that see record high temperatures as well as the the rain see a flash freeze as that front tracks off toward the east. and we are back into the cold, jeff. send tram, eastern u.s. cold through out much of all next week. we have an update on a possible case of patient dumping in baltimore. hospital workers were videotaped leaving a woman dressed in her hospital gown near a bus stop
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jeff pegues reports. >> so you are okay with leaving that woman out there like that? >> in the video. four hospital security guards are seen pushing a red wheelchair away from a bus stop. a that just left this patient in the freezing temperatures. all she had on was a hospital gown and socks. >> you are going to leave this lady out here with no clothes on. >> you were in this area when you started recording. >> yes, actually just near that, that lamp post. >> manu baracka was recording with his cell phone. >> in the heart of downtown baltimore, ♪ ♪ clothing on. vulnerable. fully exposed literally. >> go ahead and sit down. >> today the university of maryland medical center, apologized and promise aid thorough investigation. >> are you sure this is an isol c
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>> we feel comfortable in the statement that what you saw on the video is not -- is not a process that, that would occur with any frequency at all. >> there is no national data base that tracks so-called patient dumping incidents. they occur because a patient lacks insurance or financial resources. >> minimum requirement. >> katherine layman with u.s. commission on civil rights. >> what i see from that video is a person who was not stablized. is a person who needed care. clearly there was there that hospital needed to do. >> to protect her privacy we are not identifying the patient. but, in a face book post her mother said that that video was horrifying. she says that her daughter is with family and will be getting medical treatment not here, but at another medical facility. weeks after vladamir putin all but declared victory in syria, russia's main military base in syria was attacked last weekend by a mysterious swarm of drones. charlie d'agata has more
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this. until now rebel groups in syria have used remote controlled drones like the ones in the propaganda videos to drop bombs on targets. so now, picture 10 drones all together all weaponized all headed to the same target. the russian defense ministry said it suffered the first mass attack by drones, guided by a gps system, at its base in northwestern syria. another three, targeted its naval base at tartis. seven drones shot down. remaining ones were electronically jammed and forced to land. neither base suffered any casualties. the russians released these pictures today showing what they recovered. attack drones. partly made of wood, and held together with masking tape. a deadly mix of low and high tech, according to former
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british army weapons expert, pete norton. >> this particular attack is the number of drones involved against a single target. the fact that they have been launched on what appears to be completely autonomous mission. >> these drones can carry up to as many as 10 bombs each and have a longer range. more than 60 miles. the russians claim that only countries with high tech capabilities could have supplied the materials but didn't specify any country. our weapons expert told us, all of the materials are readily available on the market. jeff. >> the cbs "overnight news" will be right back.
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this is the cbs "overnight news." a bipartisan group of senators announced a deal to protect young immigrants who were brought to this country illegally by their parents. they still have got a lot to sell to the white house on the plan and push it through a skeptical congress. meanwhile the people at issue, 700,000 so-called dreamers are fearing the worst. adriana daiaz spoke to some. >> this medical school was the first to officially accept undocumented students in 2014. there are 32 being trained here. and because of daca they can study and work here, but they don't get citizenship. we sat down with three students who told us what it is like to be at the top of their academic game with no clear
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every time i hear footsteps outside my door. for a second thinks should i open the door. >> after 20 years living in the united states. he still worries immigration agents could dedatain him at an moment. born in mexico raise the in new mexico. the 28-year-old its the first to pursue his ph.d. and md at loyala university medical school. the soon to be doctor may never be able to practice legally. >> my biggest fear is that, maybe daca will remain, but there will be no, no way to go beyond daca, there will be no pathway to citizenship. >> of the 27-year-old studied chemistry in college in savannah before becoming one of the dreamers enrolled here. >> the news reminds you, twitter remind you that, at some level you are not welcomed here. >> i see the u.s. as my home. my community. my people.
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>> this woman's mother brought her to the u.s. illegally from guatemala when she was 7. >> i feel like i haven't done anything wrong. i have gone to school. i have gotten good grade. i do community service. yet, that gives me no right in a sense. >> what do you say to folks who, say, this is a country that has to have its borders has to have its laws and people have to follow those laws? >> if you had someone that, yes they enter the country illegally, 20, 30 years ago, and they're a pro duck tough member of the community, paying taxes, what is the logic behind deporting them outside of just falling an arbitrary rule. >> i've have to go, i wouldn't go to mexico. i would go to europe or canada or any other country that wants doctors. at the end of the day, we're american trained, almost physicians. any other country would jump up to take any of us. >> the students say they're anxiously counting down the days until their daca protection expires. meantime, they and the medical school here are lobbying law makers to find a long term solution. jeff.
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this is going to happen. then it doesn't happen. >> though the prospect of deportation is real. alejandra says she is not going back to mexico. >> if i had to go, i wouldn't go to mexico. i would go to europe. canada or any country that wants doctors. it is actually funny how we want to stay here. because our families are here. communities are here. at the end of the day we are american trained, almost physicians. any other country would jump up to take any of us. >> if lawmakers find no solution for daca there is no clear path for the students to complete their training. repay their loans, or practice medicine. four months after hurricane harvey devastated parts of texas, many people are still struggling to put their lives back together again. but for a lucky few help
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the way. >> lydell and john harris thought their house would be safe on 12 foot stilts near a bayou. when hurricane harvey made landfall their home was swallowed by floodwaters. 42 years of memories gone. >> of we don't have a door left in the house. washed windows out. it was -- it was just something you can't explain to people. >> of the storm left the harriss without a home. for the last six weeks they lived in a fema trailer. they briefly lived with family. but returned when john needed treatment for his lung cancer. 84-year-old john started to lose faith. he lost hope and he was just real distressed we tried hard to get help. and it was just, probably, an hour before that i told him we have to wait on god. and these people drove up in our yard. >> on cue. >> on cue. >> of when the son of man comes. >> answer to their prayers a local pastor who practices
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he preaches. off off the water was right below the gutter line. the pastor saw many church members were homeless living in rvs and tent. >> how do you let it not overwhelm you? >> you can't. because those people. those people need us to stay strong. that's the truth. is it hard? you bet. but that man needle to know that somebody is going to fight for him. >> aisaac open the flaps up. >> skipper recruited an army of volunteers from a minnesota based organization led by tony catorina that travels around the country rebuilding communities hit hard by natural disasters. >> we'll bring in supplies. bring in teams. we will help them rebuild their community. because it is all about, bringing hope to people that, that quite honestly are hopeless. >> we are thankful. appreciative of you op
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for the angels god sent me. >> for skipper and tony, their mission is not just to help the harr harrises to be there for the people for the long haul. >> this is what we run into. everywhere we go, you know the first two months. a whole bunch of people. after that. just, it's les, less, less. we're just commit the. >> as for the harrises, they may have lost their home. but the volunteers have restored their faith. >> what can you offer them for offering that they're doing? >> nothing. there its nothing but, thank you i love you. that's about it. >> skipper hopes the harriss can move back into the home by march or april. but that is going to depend on the amount of sa plupplies they and labor. skimm skipper's church hopes to have 35 families back in their homes by the end of the year.
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>> silhouette of the golden gate bridge about to changeai plan to put up a security net to keep people from jumping off. john blackstone has the story. on a stage in nashville, a singer song writer performs songs she has written that she loves to sing. ♪ ♪
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>> reporter: and one that breaks her heart. >> so this is for, casey brooks who would have turned 27 this past may. ♪ all the world's gone to sleep tonight ♪ what do you say in your song? about casey what do you sing? >> all of the world has gone to sloop tonight but you won't wake. all the world cries for you tonight but you can't see. >> she and casey grew uppen a comfortable california town, just north of san francisco. >> we learned to ride bikes together. >> senior year of high school was almost over. they were ready to go off off to cling. >> so what happened. couple months from graduating? >> january 2008, casey jumped off the golden gate bridge and ended her life. >> you had no idea? >> nobody did. >> she was
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college. she was -- a really talented writer. she had a good crew of friends. there was no -- there was no reason. as far as we could tell. it was really easy for her, there is a parking logt at the base of the bridge. the guardrail is 4 feet high. so you can just kind of pretend you are walking across the bridge and hop over and 220 foot fall. that's it. >> casey's parents and john erika brooks. >> every time we drive over the bridge, every time we look at the people laughing and, and, and smiling, and taking selfies of themselves, and, and enjoying this, that's what we used to do. and then, you know, casey jumped. and it all changed. >> reporter: the beautiful landmark at the entrance to san francisco bay has an ugly side. casey brooks is one of nearly 1,700 suicides on the bridge since its opening in 1937.
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the bridge. but that toll may be coming to an end. so i really hope that the board puts safety ahead of inconvenience. >> reporter: for years, casey's parents and sarah lockwood bar have been striving with others who lost loved ones on the bridge to convince the bridge board to erect a net, a suicide barrier. >> that is certainly not the only place by any means that people can end their lives. how would a knelt change things? >> we have learned about suicide is that, in a lot of cases it can be very impulsive. if you are prevented from bakting on the impulse the chances are very, very good you won't have a recurrence. >> i walked back toward the traffic railing, i ran forward and i catapulted myself over the rail. >> kevin heinz is up of the few who jumped and survived. he is also a strong advocate for a net to prevent others from making the same, bad decision. when did you realize it was a mistake?
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>> the millisecond my hand left the rail i was in free fall. thought was too late. >> study in 1978 of 515 people who attempted suicide on the golden gate bridge wult were stopped found that 90% did not die from suicide later. but for years, that wasn't enough off to convince officials the bridge should get a net. >> there were people who believe that, this bridge, cannot be touched. it's an iconic structure. it is sort of like the mona lisa. you can't touch the mon lisa. aesthetics issue. >> still people are going to say, millions and millions of dollars. it will ruin an icon. >> how much money would you pay your child? what's the price tag on your husband or wife? >> reporter: in the nearly ten years since she joined the campaign, to build a knelt, sarah lockwood barr has gone through times of hope and disappointment. >> we had
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something would pass. a budget would come about. and then it would get pulled because there was a new estimate on cost. and then someone else would come in with an appeal. and -- you know i kind of lost hope at a point. it just started feeling look a slap in the face every time we would get really excited something was happening. >> your grief last spring their decade of persistence finally paid off. the long struggle for a net ended with a ceremony at the bridge marking approval of plans for a $200 million suicide barrier due for completion in 2021. >> of it will be so healing. because the it also send a statement to the community and to the world, that, that, life is valuable. and life matters. this is us saying we value your life and your struggle. ♪ time is everything ♪ ♪ ♪ all of the
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sleep tonight ♪ ♪ but >> i'm alex trebek. if you're age 50 to 85, i have an important message about security. write down the number on your screen, so you can call when i finish. the lock i want to talk to you about isn't the one on your door. this is a lock for your life insurance, a rate lock, that guarantees your rate can never go up at any time, for any reason. but be careful. many policies you see do not have one, but you can get a lifetime rate lock through the colonial penn program. call this number to learn more. this plan was designed with a rate lock for people on a fixed income who want affordable life insurance that's simple to get. coverage options for just $9.95 a month, less than 35 cents a day. act now and your rate will be locked in for life.
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elementary students are getting a hand on lesson in archaeology without leaving the classroom. steve hartman found their story on the road. >> if you had to think of a good site for archaeological dig, you wouldn't think of the children's workshop school in manhattan. you almost certainly wouldn't think of the third grade classroom. you definitely wouldn't think of her coat closet. >> it's not like a tomb. not like a pyramid. >> right. >> it is a closet. >> right. really lucky that this one student decided to investigate. you know. >> that one student is this student. bobby scotto. >> hit pay dirt. literally. >> couple years ago when bobby was in miriam's class he started wondering about a crack in the clo
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>> he began poking around with his finger. then turned to pencils. shirt hangers. >> then other kids got curious. and they were totally night. >> okay. guys. >> which is why for the past two years now. miriam's students have been excavating nearly every closet in this 100-year-old school. >> i found an old coin. >> they're finding some really old things. >> card. >> some more recent. and some. >> what's this? >> much more recent. >> all of it uncovered with the kind of glee. >> wow. >> rarely seen in a grade school classroom. >> piece of metal. >> i found, three pen simms. an eraser stuck to playdough. >> wow. >> i seriously did. under there, just black, black, mystery things in black. >> just don't want to stop. basically. >> all right, guys. >> in fact they're so night. >> take you out of the closet it now. >>
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keep up with the indiana jones es. >> would have made your life easier if you said quit messing around in the close the. >> glad this didn't happen in the first couple years of teaching. pro bab probably what i would have said. scary as a teacher. >> on the flip side it can lead to some wonderful lessons. in this case, miriam says the kids got really into history and archaeology. and they got their own museum exhibit. showing off everything from antique school supplies to animal mummies. >> i found a pine cone. >> of course there are still many more findings waiting to be found. >> i found a pine cone. >> but no mat r whter what they tup. there will never be a greater treasure than the one that stand before them every day. the teacher with that special gift. for unearthing a passion. steve hartman, on the road, in new york. >> my favorite teacher. that's nice thing to fine.
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news" for this friday. from the cbs broadcast center in new york city, i'm demarco morgan. explosive comments from the president. s s he is quoted as using an expletive to describe haiti and african nations saying the u.s. need more immigrants from norway. also tonight the race to find survivors of the mudslides. ice and snow move across the midwest, headed for the northeast. and an update on the hospital that dumped a patient out into the cold. >> we take full responsibility for this failure. >> the latest in warfare. mass drone attacks. >> it was the very first one that i pulled out of the church. so we have a bond.
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>> a fire fighter completes a rescue driving the boy he saved home from the hospital. ♪ ♪ >> announcer: this is the cbs "overnight news." president trump is being quoted as making profane racially charged comments in the oval office. it happened at a meeting about immigration. those in attendance said the president complained about the u.s. taking immigrants from african countries and haiti and suggested taking more from places like norway. here is chief white house correspondent, major garrett. >> reporter: at an oval office meeting president trump lashed out at immigrants from countries in africa and the caribbean. why are we having all these people from blank countries come here the president said. using an expletive, cbs news will not repeat. this occurred when immigration negotiations turned to efforts to protect immigration from africa as well as the haiti and el salvador. according to a source briefed on the meeting, president trump then suggested the u.s. allow more immigrants from countries
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like norway. >> it has been a pleasure to host you today. >> of the president with norwegian prime minister yesterday. >> the white house did not deny the president's use of the expletive or its racially charged meaning. certain washington politicians choose to fight for foreign countries, but president trump will always fight for the american people. said white house spokesman, raj shaw in a statement. the president will only accept an immigration deal that adequately addresses the visa lottery system and chain migration. two programs that hurt our economy and alout terrorists into our country. the president's attack on immigrants came when two senators, republican lindsay graham of south carolina, and democart dick durbin of illinois suggested reducing visas in the annual lottery system from
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50,000 to 25,000 as opposed to scrapping it. tuesday the president criticized the lottery program in which applicants must meet health, education and work requirements and pass a background check. >> they're not giving you their best names. common sense means they're not giving you the best names. they're giving you've people they've don't want. >> "the new york times" reported that in june at another immigration meeting the president said all haitian if grants have aids and that all immigrants to america from nigeria come to america from huts. the white house denied both comments calling the reporting lies based on anonymous sources. and moments ago on the witter account, the congressional black caucus, cedric richmond, chairman, said the president's comments are further proof that his make america great ajen days, i quote, really a make america white again, agenda. jeff. >> major garrett at the white house, thank you. >> off the search continues for victims of the southern california mudslide. we will have much more on that search in just a moment. first potentially dangerous storm is moving across the midwest now and headed east. eric fisher is chief
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meteorologist at our cbs station in boston, wbz. eric, what its happening? >> jeff, pretty nasty kind of comb ply kated storm system that is developing. a big pull of mild air, tropical air ahead of it. clash of arctic air racing down behind it. we'll be watching over the next couple days, heavy rainfall in that warmer side of storm. but a band of snow and ice that sets up on the cold side of the storm, especially across ohio, kentucky, into parts of pennsylvania, new york. northern new england before all moves off the new england coast as we head into saturday. when it comes to snowfall, the highest totals expected to be across western into central new york where we may see up to a foot. the big story though is a dramatic drop in temperatures. st. louis hit 65. noon today t it is 35 now. it will be 15 come tomorrow morning. you can see that nice edge of colder air, racing off to the east. all the spots that see record high temperatures as well as the the rain see a flash freeze as that front tracks off toward the east. and we are back into the cold, jeff. send tram, eastern u.s. co
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now the effects of the weather in southern california. the death toll stand tonight at 17. in the mudslides that hit santa barbara county. the number could rise as search continues for the missing. carter evans is there. >> as new images of harrowing rescues. and escapes emerge from across southern california. the clean-up continues. the massive mud, vehicles and debris is slowly being cleared from montecito neighborhood and highways. today the search-and-rescue mission looks more like a recovery operation. crews found a body in this home. asthe victim's family stood by. the floodwater was so powerful when it rushed down randall road here it wiped out almost every single home on this block. these houses are worth upward of $3 million. now they're unrecognizable.
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above. before the flood. these are the boulders that came rolling down the mountain with floodwaters. there was nothing that could stop them. you can see where they blew through the wall of this home. >> we heard this monstrous sound that was like a fratd train. carrie tide was trapped in her home and says she never got a mandatory evacuation order. >> we couldn't go anywhere. meanwhile we were seeing people rescued off the roofs. of houses that were just a few doors down. >> emergency managers say they warned residents days ahead of the storm. including tweets, saying that flash flooding and debris flows were imminent. but the department hesitated to use a cell phone emergency alert system. they reportedly waited until 3:50 a.m. tuesday morning to push out the alert. roughly 10 minutes ahead of the worst flooding. telling the l.a. times heap waited because if you cry wolf, people stop listening. >> we would have evacuated.
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would have. we all are families. we have kids. and, and if that was -- dictated to us, we would have followed the rules. >> neighbors tell me the family that lives in this home was sound asleep when the mudslide hit. their children's room is right there. boulders smashed through the wall. fortunately, everyone survived. but jeff, many people still haven't been allowed back in the area to see what's left of their homes. >> carter evans, thank you very much. on the subject of the children today. the santa barbara county sheriff's released the names of 17 who diechltd four children. the youngest three. oldest victim was 89. now just one year after being sworn in, governor gre ton, find himself under siege. >> there is big news from the nation's largest private employ year. >> no matter how much pain he was in never showed it. >> the 6-year-old is recovering after the texas church massacre. the man who saved him, helped bring him home in style.
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>> i said when you are ready to leave here i will get my firetruck.
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a disturbing video we first showed you last night has gone viral now. it shows hospital staffers in baltimore, dropping off a discharged patient on a cold city street. today the hospital apologized. jeff pegue. s has our update. >> so you are okay with leaving that woman out there like that? >> in the video. four hospital security guards are seen pushing a red wheelchair away from a bus stop. a that just left this patient in the freezing temperatures. all she had on was a hospital gown and socks. >> you are going to leave this
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on. >> you were in this area when you started recording. >> yes, actually just near that, that lamp post. >> manu baracka was recording with his cell phone. >> in the heart of downtown baltimore, ♪ ♪ clothing on. vulnerable. fully exposed literally. >> go ahead and sit down. >> today the university of maryland medical center, apologized and promise aid thorough investigation. >> are you sure this is an isolated case. >> we feel comfortable in the statement that what you saw on the video is not -- is not a process that, that would occur with any frequency at all. >> there is no national data base that tracks so-called patient dumping incidents. they occur because a patient lacks insurance or financial resources. >> minimum requirement. >> katherine layman with u.s. commission on civil rights. >> what i see from that video is a person who was not stablized. is a person who needed care. clearly there was there that hospital needed to do. >> to protect her privacy we are not identifying the patient. but, in a face book post her mother said, that that strid yo was horrifying. she sayst
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medical treatment not here, but at another medical facility. jeff. >> jeff pegues staying on the storien baltimore. jeff, thank you. >> congress is trying to reach a deal by the end of next week to extend the obama era daca program. it allows immigrants who are brought illegally into the u.s. as children to live and work without fear of deportation. nearly 100 immigrants with daca status are currently enrolled in medical schools. adriana diaz sat down with a group of them. >> every tim i hear footsteps outside my door, a part of me thinks should i open the door. >> even after 20 years in the u.s., caesar montelanga worries about being deported. third year medical student born in mexico but raised in new mexico is afraid without daca he
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may never be able to practice legally. >> we will be forever stuck with this status that makes us essentially like second-class citizens. >> this woman, fled violence in mexico at 14 wants to be an obgyn. >> the news reminds you, twitter remind you that, at some level you are not welcomed here. >> i see the u.s. as my home. my community. my people. my peers. >> this woman's mother brought her to the u.s. illegally from guatemala when she was 7. >> i feel like i haven't done anything wrong. i have gone to school. i have gotten good grade. i do community service. yet, that gives me no right in a sense. >> what do you say to folks who, say, this is a country that has
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to have its borders has to have its laws and people have to follow those laws? >> if you had someone that, yes they enter the country illegally, 20, 30 years ago, and they're a pro duck tough member of the community, paying taxes, what is the logic behind deporting them outside of just falling an arbitrary rule. >> i've have to go, i wouldn't go to mexico. i would go to europe or canada or any other country that wants doctors. at the end of the day, we're american trained, almost physicians. any other country would jump up to take any of us. >> the students say they're anxiously counting down the days until their daca protection expires. meantime, they and the medical school here are lobbying law makers to find a long term solution. jeff. >> adriana, thank you. weeks after russian president vladamir putin all but declared victory in syria, russia's main military base in syria was attacked last weekend by mysterious swarm of drones.
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charlie d'agata looked into this. until now rebel groups in syria have used remote controlled drones like the ones in the propaganda videos to drop bombs on targets. so now, picture 10 drones all together all weaponized all headed to the same target. the russian defense ministry said it suffered the first mass attack by drones, guided by a gps system, at its base in northwestern syria. another three, targeted its naval base at tartis. seven drones shot down. remaining ones were electronically jammed and forced to land. neither base suffered any casualties. the russians released these pictures today showing what they recovered. attack drones. partly made of wood, and held together with masking tape. a deadly mix of low and high tech, according to former british army weapons expert, pete norton. >> this particular attack is the
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against a single target. the fact that they have been launched on what appears to be completely autonomous mission. >> these drones can carry up to as many as 10 bombs each and have a longer range. more than 60 miles. the russians claim that only countries with high tech capabilities could have supplied the materials but didn't specify any country. our weapons expert told us, all of the materials are readily available on the market. jeff. >> charlie d'agata. thank you. now to other stories we are following in the evening news feed. u.s. service member was wounded in a possible insider attack in eastern afghanistan. the taliban claimed it was carried out by two insurgents disguised as local is militiamen. friendly off to the u.s. at least seven u.s. troops were killed in the same region last year. the fbi today released age progressed photos of four men wanted for the hijacking of pan am flight 73 back in 1986,
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like now. they boarded that plane in pakistan, after a standoff murdered at least 20 people including two americans. they served prison time in pakistan but were set free without facing justice in the u.s. five women are now accusing actor james franco of sixable misconduct. "los angeles times" reports four were students at his acting school. franco denies the allegations. he within ape best actor award sunday at the golden globes among those wearing a time's up pin supporting a hollywood initiative against the abuse of power by men. >> the cbsover will be right back.
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prosecutor in st. louis opened an investigation into the governor. he admits he cheated on his wife denies accusation he's tried to blackmail his mistress. there are calls for the governor's resignation. >> i am a navy seal. i will take dead aim at politics. >> reporter: campaigned as an outsider, a family man. most importantly i am a proud husband and father. first time candidate, eric greittens, appealed to a cross section of vote is with his brains, and brawn. now, just one year after being sworn in, governor greittens find himself under siege. audio recordings from march of 2015, obtained by our st. louis affiliate, kmov, cbs has not in
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governor's alleged hairdresser admitting a consensual sexual encounter with a governor to her then husband. the alleged blackmail threat she said that scared her. >> while acknowledging the affair, the show me state governor denies all other accusations. saying show me the proof. we have not been provided the tape or the transcript and know nothing about the circumstances of how or why it was made. >> in a separate statement first lady sheena greittens has forgiven her husband. said we have a loving marriage and awesome family. anything beyond that is between us and god. as for the woman on the tape, the former hairdresser, she has not commented publicly. and according to our st. louis affiliate was not aware at the type that her ex-husband was
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recording her confession. jeff. >> thank you very much. >> up next here tonight. attention wal-mart workers, you could be getting a raise. and a bonus.
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i'm breeding, man. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. wal-mart its boogs in minimum wage and giving bonuses of $1 t the largest private employer said it is closing 60 of the sams club stores across the country. some went out of business today. workers didn't find out until they showed up and found the doors locked. >> a woman in virginia thought you would look to see this video of her husband slipping down the driveway the other day. so she posted it online. it's now been moved more than 44 million times. he its okay. wife said she is okay. but says she can't stop laughing.
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who is on thin ice now? up next, a little boy, gets a firetruck. >> i'm alex trebek. if you're age 50 to 85, i have an important message about security. write down the number on your screen, so you can call when i finish. the lock i want to talk to you about isn't the one on your door. this is a lock for your life insurance, a rate lock, that guarantees your rate can never go up at any time, for any reason. but be careful. many policies you see do not have one, but you can get a lifetime rate lock through the colonial penn program. call this number to learn more. this plan was designed with a rate lock for people on a fixed income who want affordable life insurance that's simple to get. coverage options for just $9.95 a month, less than 35 cents a day. act now and your rate will be locked in for life.
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we end with a little buy who got the ride of his life today. omar vilafranca was there. >> reporter: dozens of people gathered on the south texas highway for ryan moore's homecoming. that's him in the front of the firetruck. he isn't just any 6-year-old. and this isn't just any trip home.
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he is the reason that we stay positive through all of this. >> today is special because for the last two months, ryland was living in a south texas hospital. last november, a gunman attacked his church in suterland springs, texas. 26 people were killed that morning. ryland was shot five times. his stepmother, joanne died shielding the boy. his two sisters brook and emily didn't make it. >> i was, rusty duncan is a stockdale volunteer fire fighter and responded to the shooting. inside the church ryland was the first person he noticed. >> i felt there was something holding my pant leg. look down a little arm. so i, i, picked him up. and, and, carried him outside right away. >> rusty would visit ryland in the hospital all most every
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sunday. the visits kept ryland's spirits up. >> he is very energetic. no matter how much pain he was in, he never showed it. >> when ryland learned he would finally be going home, he wanted to go in style. luckily, he had a new friend with a pretty sweet ride. >> he asked me to go faster. he asked me to, to, if the siren could be any louder. and he wanted me to blow the horn more. ryland is finally home. he still has a mom, a dad, and a sister. and he still has got a long road to recovery. but residents of this small south texas town say they will be with ryland for every step. that is the "overnight news" for this friday.
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>> announcer: this is the cbs "overnight news." hi, welcome to the "overnight news," i'm demarco morgan. hope is beginning to fade in southern california, where rescue teams are still clawing through debris searching for survivors of the devastating mudslide. montecito hardest hit when boulders, trees came crashing through homes and businesses. carter evans begins our coverage. >> as new images of harrowing rescues. and escapes emerge from across southern california. the clean-up continues. the massive mud, vehicles and debris is slowly being cleared from montecito neighborhood and highways. today the search-and-rescue mission looks more like a
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crews found a body in this home. as the victim's family stood by. the floodwater was so powerful when it rushed down randall road here it wiped out almost every single home on this block. these houses are worth upward of $3 million. now they're unrecognizable. here is what it looked like from above. before the flood. these are the boulders that came rolling down the mountain with floodwaters. there was nothing that could stop them. you can see where they blew through the wall of this home. >> we heard this monstrous sound that was like a fratd train. carrie tide was trapped in her home and says she never got a mandatory evacuation order. >> we couldn't go anywhere. meanwhile we were seeing people rescued off the roofs. of houses that were just a few doors down. >> emergency managers say they warned residents days ahead of the storm. including tweets, saying that flash flooding and debris flows were imminent. but the department hesitated to use a cell phone emergency alert st
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3:50 a.m. tuesday morning to push out the alert. roughly 10 minutes ahead of the worst flooding. telling the l.a. times heap waited because if you cry wolf, people stop listening. >> we would have evacuated. everybody in my neighborhood would have. we all are families. we have kids. and, and if that was -- dictated to us, we would have followed the rules. >> neighbors tell me the family that lives in this home was sound asleep when the mudslide hit. their children's room is right there. boulders smashed through the wall. fortunately, everyone survived. but jeff, many people still haven't been allowed back in the area to see what's left of their homes. there is more severe weather on the horizon. meteorologist eric fisher with your overnight news forecast. >> pretty nasty, complicated storm system developing. a big pull of mild air.
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we'll be watching heavy rainfall in the warmer side of the storm. that warmer side of storm. but a band of snow and ice that sets up on the cold side of the storm, especially across ohio, kentucky, into parts of pennsylvania, new york. northern new england before all moves off the new england coast as we head into saturday. when it comes to snowfall, the highest totals expected to be across western into central new york where we may see up to a foot. the big story though is a dramatic drop in temperatures. st. louis hit 65. noon today t it is 35 now. it will be 15 come tomorrow morning. you can see that nice edge of colder air, racing off to the east. all the spots that see record high temperatures as well as the the rain see a flash freeze as that front tracks off toward the east. and we are back into the cold, jeff. send tram, eastern u.s. cold through out much of all next week. we have an update on a possible case of patient dumping in baltimore. hospital workers were videotaped leaving a woman dressed in her hospital gown near a bus stop in the freezing cold.
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jeff pegues reports. >> so you are okay with leaving that woman out there like that? >> in the video. four hospital security guards are seen pushing a red wheelchair away from a bus stop. a that just left this patient in the freezing temperatures. all she had on was a hospital gown and socks. >> you are going to leave this lady out here with no clothes on. >> you were in this area when you started recording. >> yes, actually just near that, that lamp post. >> manu baracka was recording with his cell phone. >> in the heart of downtown baltimore, ♪ ♪ clothing on. vulnerable. fully exposed literally. >> go ahead and sit down. >> today the university of maryland medical center, apologized and promise aid thorough investigation. >> are you sure this is an isolated case. >> we feel comfortable in the statement that what you saw on the video is not -- is not a process that, that would occur with any frequency at all.
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base that tracks so-called patient dumping incidents. they occur because a patient lacks insurance or financial resources. >> minimum requirement. >> katherine layman with u.s. commission on civil rights. >> what i see from that video is a person who was not stablized. is a person who needed care. clearly there was there that hospital needed to do. >> to protect her privacy we are not identifying the patient. but, in a face book post her mother said that that video was horrifying. she says that her daughter is with family and will be getting medical treatment not here, but at another medical facility. weeks after vladamir putin all but declared victory in syria, russia's main military base in syria was attacked last weekend by a mysterious ar
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drones. charlie d'agata has more on this. until now rebel groups in syria have used remote controlled drones like the ones in the propaganda videos to drop bombs on targets. so now, picture 10 drones all together all weaponized all headed to the same target. the russian defense ministry said it suffered the first mass attack by drones, guided by a gps system, at its base in northwestern syria. another three, targeted its naval base at tartis. seven drones shot down. remaining ones were electronically jammed and forced to land. neither base suffered any casualties. the russians released these pictures today showing what they recovered. attack drones. partly made of wood, and held together with masking tape. a deadly mix of low and high tech, according to former british army weapons expert, pete norton. >> this particular attack is the number of drones involved against a single target.
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the fact that they have been launched on what appears to be completely autonomous mission. >> these drones can carry up to as many as 10 bombs each and have a longer range. more than 60 miles. the russians claim that only countries with high tech capabilities could have supplied the materials but didn't specify any country. our weapons expert told us, all of the materials are readily available on the market. jeff. >> the cbs "overnight news" will be right back.
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this is the cbs "overnight news." a bipartisan group of senators announced a deal to protect young immigrants who were brought to this country illegally by their parents. they still have got a lot to sell to the white house on the plan and push it through a skeptical congress. meanwhile the people at issue, 700,000 so-called dreamers are fearing the worst. adriana diaz spoke to some. >> this medical school was the first to officially accept undocumented students in 2014. there are 32 being trained here. and because of daca they can study and work here, but they don't get citizenship. we sat down with three students who told us what it is like to be at the top of their academic game with no clear future. every time i hear footsteps outside my door. for a second thinks should i
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open the door. >> after 20 years living in the united states. he still worries immigration agents could detain him at any moment. born in mexico raise the in new mexico. the 28-year-old its the first to pursue his ph.d. and md at loyala university medical school. the soon to be doctor may never be able to practice legally. >> my biggest fear is that, maybe daca will remain, but there will be no, no way to go beyond daca, there will be no pathway to citizenship. >> of the 27-year-old studied chemistry in college in savannah before becoming one of the dreamers enrolled here. >> the news reminds you, twitter remind you that, at some level you are not welcomed here. >> i see the u.s. as my home. my community. my people. my peers. >> this woman's mother brought her to the u.s. illegally from guatemala when she was 7. >> i feel like i haven't done anything wrong. i have gone to school. i have gotten good grade.
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yet, that gives me no right in a sense. >> what do you say to folks who, say, this is a country that has to have its borders has to have its laws and people have to follow those laws? >> if you had someone that, yes they enter the country illegally, 20, 30 years ago, and they're a pro duck tough member of the community, paying taxes, what is the logic behind deporting them outside of just falling an arbitrary rule. >> i've have to go, i wouldn't go to mexico. i would go to europe or canada or any other country that wants doctors. at the end of the day, we're american trained, almost physicians. any other country would jump up to take any of us. >> the students say they're anxiously counting down the days until their daca protection expires. meantime, they and the medical school here are lobbying law
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makers to find a long term solution. jeff. this is going to happen. then it doesn't happen. >> though the prospect of deportation is real. alejandra says she is not going back to mexico. >> if i had to go, i wouldn't go to mexico. i would go to europe. canada or any country that wants doctors. it is actually funny how we want to stay here. because our families are here. communities are here. at the end of the day we are american trained, almost physicians. any other country would jump up to take any of us. >> if lawmakers find no solution for daca there is no clear path for the students to complete their training. repay their loans, or practice medicine. four months after hurricane harvey devastated parts of texas, many people are still struggling to put their lives back together again. but for a lucky few help its on the way.
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thought their house would be safe on 12 foot stilts near a bayou. when hurricane harvey made landfall their home was swallowed by floodwaters. 42 years of memories gone. >> of we don't have a door left in the house. washed windows out. it was -- it was just something you can't explain to people. >> of the storm left the harriss without a home. for the last six weeks they lived in a fema trailer. they briefly lived with family. but returned when john needed treatment for his lung cancer. 84-year-old john started to lose faith. he lost hope and he was just real distressed we tried hard to get help. and it was just, probably, an hour before that i told him we have to wait on god. and these people drove up in our yard. >> on cue. >> on cue. >> of when the son of man comes. >> answer to their prayers
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he preaches. off off the water was right below the gutter line. the pastor saw many church members were homeless living in rvs and tent. >> how do you let it not overwhelm you? >> you can't. because those people. those people need us to stay strong. that's the truth. is it hard? you bet. but that man needle to know that somebody is going to fight for him. >> isaac open the flapsup. >> skipper recruited an army of volunteers from a minnesota based organization led by tony catorina that travels around the country rebuilding communities hit hard by natural disasters. >> we'll bring in supplies. bring in teams. we will help them rebuild their community. because it is all about, bringing hope to people that, that quite honestly are hopeless. >> we are thankful. appreciative of you people. for the angels god sent me.
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>> for skipper and tony, their mission is not just to help the harrises to be there for the people for the long haul. >> this is what we run into. everywhere we go, you know the first two months. a whole bunch of people. after that. just, it's les, less, less. we're just commit the. >> as for the harrises, they may have lost their home. but the volunteers have restored their faith. >> what can you offer them for offering that they're doing? >> nothing. there its nothing but, thank you i love you. that's about it. >> skipper hopes the harriss can move back into the home by march or april. but that is going to depend on the amount of supplies they get and labor. skipper's church hopes to have
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by the end of the year.
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mary had a little lamb whose fleece was white as snow. but after an electrical fire from faulty wiring, mary's vintage clothing and designer shoe collection were ruined. luckily, the geico insurance agency had recently helped mary with renters insurance, and she got a totally fab replacement wardrobe at bloomingdale's. mary was inspired to start her own fashion line, exclusively for little lambs. visit geico.com and see how affordable renters insurance can be.
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breathe freely fast wmy congestion's gone. i can breathe again! i can breathe again! vicks sinex... breathe on. >> silhouette of the golden gate bridge about to changeai plan to put up a security net to keep people from jumping off. john blackstone has the story. on a stage in nashville, a singer song writer performs songs she has written that she loves to sing. ♪ ♪ >> reporter: and one that breaks her heart. >> so this is for, casey brooks who would have turned 27 this past may. ♪ all the world's gone to sleep
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tonight ♪ what do you say in your song? about casey what do you sing? >> all of the world has gone to sloop tonight but you won't wake. all the world cries for you tonight but you can't see. >> she and casey grew uppen a comfortable california town, just north of san francisco. >> we learned to ride bikes together. >> senior year of high school was almost over. they were ready to go off off to cling. >> so what happened. couple months from graduating? >> january 2008, casey jumped off the golden gate bridge and ended her life. >> you had no idea? >> nobody did. >> she was already accepted into college. she was -- a really talented writer. she had a good crew of friends. there was no -- there was no reason. as far as we could tell. it was really easy for her, there is a parking logt at the base of the bridge. the guardrail is 4 feet high.
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so you can just kind of pretend you are walking across the bridge and hop over and 220 foot fall. that's it. >> casey's parents and john erika brooks. >> every time we drive over the bridge, every time we look at the people laughing and, and, and smiling, and taking selfies of themselves, and, and enjoying this, that's what we used to do. and then, you know, casey jumped. and it all changed. >> reporter: the beautiful landmark at the entrance to san francisco bay has an ugly side. casey brooks is one of nearly 1,700 suicides on the bridge since its opening in 1937. in 2016, 39 people jumped from the bridge. but that toll may be coming to an end. so i really hope that the board puts safety ahead of inconvenience. >> reporter: for years, casey's
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parents and sarah lockwood bar have been striving with others who lost loved ones on the bridge to convince the bridge board to erect a net, a suicide barrier. >> that is certainly not the only place by any means that people can end their lives. how would a knelt change things? >> we have learned about suicide is that, in a lot of cases it can be very impulsive. if you are prevented from bakting on the impulse the chances are very, very good you won't have a recurrence. >> i walked back toward the traffic railing, i ran forward and i catapulted myself over the rail. >> kevin heinz is up of the few
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who jumped and survived. he is also a strong advocate for a net to prevent others from making the same, bad decision. when did you realize it was a mistake? >> the millisecond my hand left the rail i was in free fall. thought was too late. >> study in 1978 of 515 people who attempted suicide on the golden gate bridge wult were stopped found that 90% did not die from suicide later. but for years, that wasn't enough off to convince officials the bridge should get a net. >> there were people who believe that, this bridge, cannot be touched. it's an iconic structure. it is sort of like the mona lisa. you can't touch the mon lisa. aesthetics issue. >> still people are going to say, millions and millions of dollars. it will ruin an icon.
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>> how much money would you pay your child? what's the price tag on your husband or wife? >> reporter: in the nearly ten years since she joined the campaign, to build a knelt, sarah lockwood barr has gone through times of hope and disappointment. >> we had all these fakeouts. something would pass. a budget would come about. and then it would get pulled because there was a new estimate on cost. and then someone else would come in with an appeal. and -- you know i kind of lost hope at a point. it just started feeling look a slap in the face every time we would get really excited something was happening. >> your grief last spring their decade of persistence finally paid off. the long struggle for a net ended with a ceremony at the bridge marking approval of plans for a $200 million suicide barrier due for completion in 2021. >> of it will be so healing. because the it also send a statement to the community and to the world, that, that, life is valuable. and life matters. this is us saying we value your life and your struggle. ♪ time is everything ♪ ♪ ♪ all of the world has gone to
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sleep tonight ♪ ♪ but you are
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captioning funded by cbs it's friday, january 12th, 2018. this is the "cbs morning news." no deal. president trump rejects a bipartisan immigration proposal, but it was his vulgar racially charged quote about haiti, el salvador, and african countries that has lawmakers on both sides of the aisle sounding off. rain in the country and putting friends first. the change facebook is making to your news fooed.

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