Skip to main content

tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  January 2, 2018 2:07am-3:57am EST

2:07 am
investigators in realizing that russia might be attempting to interfere significantly in the u.s. election. jericka. >> chip reid, thank you very much. the cbs "overnight news" will be right back.
2:08 am
>> i'm alex trebek. if you're age 50 to 85, i have an important message about security. write down the number on your screen, so you can call when i finish. the lock i want to talk to you about isn't the one on your door. this is a lock for your life insurance, a rate lock, that guarantees your rate can never go up at any time, for any reason. but be careful. many policies you see do not have one, but you can get a lifetime rate lock through the colonial penn program. call this number to learn more. this plan was designed with a rate lock for people on a fixed income who want affordable life insurance that's simple to get. coverage options for just $9.95 a month, less than 35 cents a day. act now and your rate will be locked in for life.
2:09 am
it will never increase, guaranteed. this is lifelong coverage that can never be cancelled as long as you pay your premiums, guaranteed. and your acceptance is guaranteed, with no health questions. you cannot be turned down because of your health. call for your information kit and read about this rate lock for yourself. you'll also get a free gift with great information both are free, with no obligation, so don't miss out. call for information, then decide. read about the 30 day, 100 percent money back guarantee. don't wait, call this number now. ♪
2:10 am
>> this is the cbs "overnight news." the president has also been tweeting his support for protesters in iran. they have taken to the streets for five straight days fed up with a bad economy and government corruption. state media says 12 people have been killed. elizabeth palmer covered the last big protests in iran in 2009. she joins us from london. you know what is behind the unrest? >> well, it started very small. on thursday, in the regional city of mashad with a single demonstration against as you said economic hardship, especially the price of food. but overnight, it just morphed and spread like wildfire. to the capital, tehran, where crowd vandalized one of the main
2:11 am
and to dozens of smaller cities across the country which is very unusual. now the protesters are especially young people and the working poor and they're angry about everything from corruption and unemployment to lack of freedom and religious rule. the police have broken up appropriate tests here and there with water cannons. they have arrested hundred of people. but we have not yet anyway seen the kind of vief leolent crackdn 2009 when security forces shot and killed people in the street for protesting election results. >> liz, how have authority handled the protests this time? >> president hassan rouhani, a moderate went on television with a surprisingly measured response. he said people did have a legitimate right to protest, as long as there was no violence. now, that may have been a warning to the security forces too, this is a volatile, dangerous situation. and he knows that hey lethal crackdown could send it
2:12 am
spiraling out of control and could become a bloodbath. >> elizabeth palmer in london. thank you. >> president trump signalled he is welling to extend protections for young immigrants brought into the country illegally. but on one condition -- last week he tweeted there can be no daca without the des frwall nee the southern border. do walls really work? mark phillips went to were ln to find out. >> reporter: at this point you would have been in the car, coming this way? >> if anybody knows anything about walls it is probably hans peter spitsner. >> you would have approached checkpoint charlie. >> first time he was at checkpoint charlie was when help and daughter peggy would be the last people to escape across the berlin wall before it fell. >> a great dangerous for us. >> a tourist attraction now.
2:13 am
east german regime in 1961, the wall was a death zone almost three decade. while around, 5,000 people escaped across, through, and, over, or under it. at least 139 died trying. some death estimates run to over 1,000. hans peter was desperate. >> this is the car, i crossed the border. >> owned by american gi, now a family front. with his wife ingrid in the west allowed out for an aging aunt's birthday. with peggy 7 years old at the time, hans peter asked dozens of gis with access to east germany to smuggle them out. only eric yah agreed to hide them in his trun tick. >> i said you are a member of my family. >> they have strong views about walls not just the berlin example now a living history
2:14 am
security barrier the israelis have built between them and the palestinians, or going back to the great wall of china, they see all walls as monuments to political failure. the berlin wall of course was different than all the others. others were designed to keep people out. and this one, designed to keep them in. there is one thing they all have in common though. critics will tell you though that when governments build walls, a sign that something else isn't working. >> it is always to keep someone in, keep someone out. keep someone from doing something. always a bad thing, really. the monument with the will that can always be overcome. >> i say never again. never again. please. >> mark phillips, cbs news, berlin. ♪ now some other stories we are following in our "evening news feed." in colorado authorities
2:15 am
reel as the the man who fired more than 100 shots in his apartment at sheriff's deputies. deputy zachary parish was killed. four others wounded. reel was later killed by a swat team. >> investigators are trying to find out what caused a charter plen to crash in costa rica yesterday. ten americans among the 12 people killed. victims include a new york couple and their three sons as well as a family of four from florida. and in an odd twist, a hawaiian airlines jetliner took its passengers back in time. the jet left new zealand at 126789. 05 a.m., january 1st, after crossing the international date line it arierived eight hours later in honolulu, 10:13 a.m., december 31, 2017. now that it is 2018, thousands of new laws will take effect across the country. including onet
2:16 am
>> taking the plunge. to start the year, it is not for the feint of heart. >> a simple letter with a simple request. >> i asked my mom, whose tummy did i come from? they told my brothers about it. i was the only one left in the dark. ♪
2:17 am
jack and jill went up the hill to fetch a pail of water. all because of a burst water pipe in their house that ruined the hardwood floors in their kitchen. luckily the geico insurance agency had helped them with homeowners insurance and the inside of their house was repaired and floors replaced. jack and jill no longer have to fetch water. they now fetch sugar-free vanilla lattes with almond milk. call geico and see how affordable homeowners insurance can be.
2:18 am
try degree ultraclear black + white ♪ saves your white clothes from yellow stains and black clothes from white marks still with 48 hour sweat protection. try degree ultraclear black + white it won't let you down can this much love be cleaned by a little bit of dawn ultra? oh yeah one bottle has the grease cleaning power of three bottles of this other liquid. a drop of dawn and grease is gone. the new year brings new l
2:19 am
around the country. a ribbon cutting at dispensary in oakland, california, marked the start of legal sales of marijuana in the state. california its the 8th largest state to legalize pot for recreational uses. jamie yuccas reports on what else has changed. >> workers fryitrying to scrape are getting a raise. minimum wage is raising in 18 states. maine to california. also in the golden state, pot shops can now open for business. california is the largest state to allow recreational use of marijuana. for those caught up in the battle between local police and federal immigration agents, california is now a sanctuary state. police will not be allowed to ask about immigration status or hold any one for deportation unless that person has been convicted of a crime. in california, this used to be jaywa jaywalking. now you can cross the street once the countdown clock starts.
2:20 am
in other states, high school coaches must be frand trained t concussions, aimed at better protecting athletes. teens in colorado face a crackdown on texting. illinois, who gets the dog in a divorce? like children, judges will de r determine sole or joint custody for pets whuch, who gets to clam on their taxes? maybe congress can pass that later this year. >> iceland has become the first nation to require equal pay. as of today, it is illegal for icelandic companies with 25 or more workers to pay women less than men for the same work. when we come back, new year celebrations gone wrong. floorsd bucket is a hassle, meaning you probably don't clean as often as you'd like. for a quick and convenient clean, try swiffer wetjet. there's no heavy bucket, or mop to wring out,
2:21 am
traps dirt and liquid inside the pad. it's safe to use on all finished surfaces tile, laminate and hardwood. and it prevents streaks and hazing better than a micro fiber strip mop, giving you a thorough clean the first time. for a convenient clean, try swiffer wetjet with a money back guarantee. brand power. helping you buy better.
2:22 am
>> for the 129th year the rose parade rolled through pasadena, california, and featured 39 colorful floats covered in flowers and show horses and marching bands. new year's celebrations struck the right note, across the country. this was nashville. and in las vegas, fireworks welcomed 2018. more than 300,000 revellers packed the strip and free mont street under unprecedented security. some celebrations did go wrong. in australia, a barge filled with fireworks caught f
2:23 am
exploded. forcing people on shore to scatter. and in russia, an 80 foot christmas tree became a towering inferno after catching fire during an outdoor concert. no one was hurt. >> brave swimmers around the world welcomed newt year with a plunge. in new york more than 1,000 swimmers joined the coney island polar bear club for a dip in the atlantic ocean. ice welcomed revellers in wisconsin, and in the netherlands, hundreds put on red hats before diving into the chilly north sea. >> the coast guard just released video of a dramatic rescue, of panama city, florida. an 89-year-old man had driven off a pier on saturday. guard members broke the car's within dou window and pulled the driver to safety. >> we have new lives to celebrate. parents jenika lynch and
2:24 am
welcomed their son, the first american baby born in 2018. 6 pound, 15 ounces. he was born two second past midnight in guam. up next, proof that parental love endures. even when separated by many miles and decades.
2:25 am
2:26 am
it's a journey. and every step along the way, the uso is there. it's an experience that soldier will never forget
2:27 am
hat the uso does. [announcer] be a part of their journey, learn more today at uso.org. michelle miller has a final story. it begins years ago with two desperate parents who hope to one day see their baby again. >> reporter: it was asome pull letter with a simple request. >> is it possible that in ten years you could meet us on this bridge. it was, so heartfelt. and i thought, oh, my. these birth parents went through a difficult time. >> reporter: the request to meet came from chinese parents who had abandoned their second born in a market. they violated china's one child policy. that child katie was adopted by michigan couple ken and ruth polar, the polars never forgot the note with katie's chinese name. when she turned 10 in 2005 they sent a messenger to the id
2:28 am
by chance, a chinese tv crew captured him on tape. >> holding a sign, the name on the sign is the name in the note. >> filmmaker, was so compelled by the story, he made a documentary about it. the story became famous in china. back in the u.s. the polars remained silent. >> you know, i asked my mom, whose tummy did i come from. i realize i'd didn't come from her tummy. >> this is really something quite big for her to deal with at this time in her life. >> the polars didn't tell katie until she was 20. >> they told my brother as the bout it. i was kind of the only one left in the dark. >> how did that make you feel? >> i was definitely upset for a little while. but, yeah, whether or not it was the best way.
2:29 am
a guidebook for how to approach this subject. >> this summer, katey finally got the chance to meet her birth parents. a week after her 22nd birthday. made overwhelming by the bare yifrz la barriers of language and culture. >> are they real to you? >> yes they are real. >> still a family once lost has been found. michelle miller, grand rapid, michigan. >> that's the "overnight news" for this tuesday. for some of you've the news continues. for others check back with uts later for the morning news and of course, cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm jericka duncan.
2:30 am
welcome to the "overnight news." i'm jericka kduncan. president trump is starting the new year back at the white house after ringing in 2018 at his private club in florida. with the holiday festivities over. the president has a full plate of work on his desk from hammering legislative goals to several global flash-points. here achip reid. >> the president first lady, baron and other family members welcome the ne
2:31 am
>> we will have a great year. fantastic 2018. >> asked for comment on north korean leader, kim jong-un's claim he has a nuclear button on his desk and missiles capable of hitting the u.s. president said only this. >> we'll see. we'll see. first tweet of the new year aimed at pakistan which he accused of lies and deceit and giving safe haven off to the terrorists we hunt in afghanistan. no more. pakistan fired back. noting its cooperation that decimated al qaeda over last 16 years. and accusing the u.s. of giving them nothing but invective and mistrust. >> the president visited the trump national golf club nine times and today. this evening, returning to washington he will face a litany of challenges including the government will run out of money january 19, raising threat of partial government shutdown. next weekend he will meet with republican congressional leaders at camp david to hash out 2018 legislative agenda.
2:32 am
top priorities include massive investment in the nation's infrastructure. and, legislation to allow nearly 800,000 immigrants known as dreamers who came to the u.s. illegally as children to stay here permanent leap. looming over everything will be the special counsel investigation of the 2016 election and possible involvement of the trump campaign. the new york times reported, former campaign aide papadopoulos, told a australian diplomat russia had political dirt on hillary clinton. information that was then passed on to the u.s. a knowledgeable former u.s. official tells cbs news that information that was provided by australia was "key" to u.s. investigators in realizing that russia might be attempting to interfere significantly in the u.s. election. jericka. >> chip reid, thank you very much. the president has been tweeting support for protesters
2:33 am
they have take tine the streets for five straight days, fed up with a bad economy and government corruption. state media says 12 people have been killed. elizabeth palmer covered the last big protest in iran in 2009 and she joins us from london you. know what its behind the unrest? >> well, it started very small. on thursday, in the regional city of mashad with a single demonstration against as you said economic hardship, especially the price of food. but overnight, it just morphed and spread like wildfire. to the capital, tehran, where crowd vandalized one of the main shopping avenues. and to dozens of smaller cities across the country which is very unusual. now the protesters are especially young people and the working poor and they're angry about everything from corruption and unemployment to lack of freedom and religious rule. the police have broken up fro tests here and there with water cannons. they have arrested hundred of people. but we have not yet anyway seen the kind
2:34 am
2009 when security forces shot and killed people in the street for protesting election results. >> liz, how have authority handled the protests this time? >> president hassan rouhani, a moderate went on television with a surprisingly measured response. he said people did have a legitimate right to protest, as long as there was no violence. now, that may have been a warning to the security forces too, this is a volatile, dangerous situation. and he knows that hey lethal crackdown could send it spiraling out of control and could become a bloodbath. >> elizabeth palmer in london. thank you. >> president trump signalled he is welling to extend protections for young immigrants brought into the country illegally. but on one condition -- last week he tweeted there can be no daca without the desperately needed wall at the southern
2:35 am
do walls really work? mark phillips went to were ln to find out. >> reporter: at this point you would have been in the car, coming this way? >> if anybody knows anything about walls it is probably hans peter spitsner. >> you would have approached checkpoint charlie. >> first time he was at checkpoint charlie was when help and daughter peggy would be the last people to escape across the berlin wall before it fell. >> a great dangerous for us. >> a tourist attraction now. but from its building by the old east german regime in 1961, the wall was a death zone almost three decade. while around, 5,000 people escaped across, through, and, over, or under it. at least 139 died trying. some death estimates run to over 1,000. hans peter was desperate. >> this is the car, i crossed the border.
2:36 am
family front. with his wife ingrid in the west allowed out for an aging aunt's birthday. with peggy 7 years old at the time, hans peter asked dozens of gis with access to east germany to smuggle them out. only eric yah agreed to hide them in his trunk. >> i said you are a member of my family. >> they have strong views about walls not just the berlin example now a living history lesson. whether it is here or the security barrier the israelis have built between them and the palestinians, or going back to the great wall of china, they see all walls as monuments to political failure. the berlin wall of course was different than all the others. others were designed to keep people out. and this one, designed to keep them in. there is one thing they all have in common though. critics will tell you though
2:37 am
walls, a sign that something else isn't working. >> it is always to keep someone in, keep someone out. keep someone from doing something. always a bad thing, really. the monument with the will that can always be overcome. >> i say never again. never again. please. >> mark phillips, cbs news, berlin. >> the cbs "overnight news" will be right back.
2:38 am
i was wondering if an electric toothbrusthan a manual.s better and my hygienist says it does but they're not all the same. who knew? i had no idea. so she said, look for one that's shaped like a dental tool with a round brush head. go pro with oral-b. oral-b's rounded brush head surrounds each tooth to gently remove more plaque. and unlike sonicare, oral-b is the only electric toothbrush brand accepted by the american dental association for its effectiveness and safety. my mouth feels so clean. i'll only use an oral-b. oral-b. brush like a pro.
2:39 am
try degree ultraclear black + white ♪ saves your white clothes from yellow stains and black clothes from white marks still with 48 hour sweat protection. try degree ultraclear black + white it won't let you down
2:40 am
getting in shape is always a top new year's resolution. if you are looking for a new workout strategy. superstar quarterback tom brady is sharing his secrets to success. at 40 years old, brady is not slowing down in a game dominated by younger players. the five time super bowl champ reveals his fitness and diet regimen in his new book, the tb 12 method huh to achieve a lifetime of sustained peak performance. published by simon and schuster, di v division of cbs. >> some people want denser muscles. as the an athlete, i don't want them. i want them strong and act
2:41 am
>> you describe pliability as lengthening and softening of the muscles. everybody thinks they want muscles to be harder. >> we have been educated on. i have seen really strong, physically fit guys the definition of health that are ones injured the most. if i can keep my muscles pliable, i can, hopefully, you know, limit the intensity or limit injerry altogether. you know if i do absorb some of the forces. >> on average, a professional football player lasts just six years in the nfl. compare that to brady who is just wrapping up his 18th regular season. he credits his longevity to a more holistic approach to fitness. >> we talk rehab all the time. we get injured. we go to rehab. you talk about pliability in terms of, prehab. >> yeah. >> meaning, pliability can prevent injury. >> yeah. not just athletes but for everybody. everyone, my parents could do it. my sisters can do it.
2:42 am
my son whose leg was sore. he is 8 years old. >> trying to make the case, pliability a whole different way to look at athleticism. >> a philosophy he adopted after meeting long time trainer and business parter alex guchlt errero. >> you describe alex not as a body coach but body engineer? >> yeah, when my elbow was in pain. basically every day. alex, through his treatments, in 2004, he started lengthening and softening all of the muscle in my forearm. it took away the tension in the muscle i was like god that makes so much sense. the band here. >> pliability can be achieved in a lot of band work? >> band work will, increase your strength. while, limiting the density of the muscle. the denser the muscle means the less ply built its. most of our workouts are, all resistance bands bapsed. >> brady any sports therapy center doesn't look like an average gym. 90% of the training i
2:43 am
flexible bands. followed by specific massage technique to foal cuss on problem areas of the body. >> i would say i am faster now and quicker now than when i first started playing football, in high school. >> you are faster at age 40 than 18. >> yeah, i am. >> all my friend who are, moms are going to be saying to their husband. like tom brady is better at 40 than he was at 18. all of these band in their christmas. >> there should be. >> you really want to play into your mid 40s? >> yeah. that's the goal for me. >> does giselle agree with that? >> i think we go back and forth. she will say, ten years ago you told me ten years. now it's ten years. now you are saying another, five years. >> do you worry about concussions? >> i don't worry about them. no, i am not oblivious to them. some of my idol s had to retire because of head injuries. yeah, i'm conscious of it. i love the sport, i will keep playing. i will do everything to take care of of my body in advance
2:44 am
sunday. >> the cbs "overnight news" will be right back.
2:45 am
2:46 am
2:47 am
dads don't take sick days... dads take dayquil severe. the non-drowsy, coughing, aching, fever, sore throat... ...stuffy head, no sick days medicine. with the holidays in the rearview mirror, hollywood is looking forward to award season. one of the names getting early oscar buzz is actor james franco. being praised for a movie that tell the story of another film, a cult classic considered to be one of the worst movies ever made. here's tony dokoupil. >> there are a lot of things i would look to do other than watch a bad movie for two hours. there are hundreds of people in there. why are people packed for this. >> you will see. they all. it is -- it is an event. >> this is a midnight screening of "the ro
2:48 am
a 2003 film so bad it is almost good. >> you are lying. i never hit you. you are tearing me apart, lisa! >> it is considered one of the worst movies of all time. and this guy, tommy wazou, the director and star has become a cult hero. 14 years later, his film is still in theaters. >> you really going to make the thing? >> we are going to, yeah. >> hey! >> what any more, wazou and his critical flop are the subject of a few milk, a critical darling. >> this is my movie. this is my life. >> the disaster artist. directed by, and starring, james franco. >> you have a malevolent presence. you are perfect villain. i could see you as dracula. frankenstein. >> i am not frankenstein. i am the hero. >> he introduced
2:49 am
room's fans. >> james franco. right here. >> franco decided to address them in wasou's curious accent. >> everyone close your eye and see if you know who talking. i think tommy is artist, you know, i look to tell story about artist, great artist. >> franco too is an artist. and a serious one. you may mav seen him in spiderman. if only i could cause you the pain that you caused me. or, his oscar nominated role in 127 hours. >> ah! >> but he has also written fiction and poetry. and staged art exhibitions over the course of his two decade long career. >> james. >> jam. >> today franco now almost 40, says he is slowing down. and putting a new focus on -- franco. >> we have been surfing what five months
2:50 am
>> yeah. >> two weeks ago he got a new surfboard and invited us along for its maiden voyage. to hear him tell it, the new james franco swims with a different kind of hollywood shark. >> this fin, like jaws, pops up, like, from here to look right over there. >> are you telling me a story right now about a shark appearing on your very first day out as the a surfer. are you kidding me? >> no. >> wow. >> no fin sightings this time. but itch you look closely, franco barely escapes my wobbly first ride of the day. his board wasn't so lucky. >> brand new board. virgin, virgin session. tony sliced it. >> you could say franco's wild ride began as a restless teen in northern, california. >> by the tame i was 17 -- yeah, i was -- i was on probation. a wardf
2:51 am
>> he soon found a creative outlet for his energy. >> i needed it. when i stopped acting ow and getting arested. i threw all that energy into art. >> in fact, he dropped out of college, to pursue acting. and franco's parents, especially, his father, thought their eldest son was being foolish. >> if you want to be -- an artist, of any kind, like, like, people are not going to beg you to do it. you have to want to do it. you have to put in the work. you have to prove it. my parents didn't believe in me. you know it is look i had to, do it. >> franco's career, took off. from the outside looking at that, people are thinking, guys got it all. money. success. >> yeah, but. >> but. >> sound like you have a but. >> i was at this point where -- i was really depressed. like you said from an outside
2:52 am
great career. but i was depressed. >> reporter: in search of relief. franco became a student in 2007. in typical franco fashion he didn't get one degree, he got seven. let's not forget he was still acting, directing, and teaching, at several universities. >> at one point i was doing a broadway play of mice and men. acting in a film. propose deucing a film during the day. and on my day off mondays, i was flying back to l.a. and teaching at three schools. and, so, that is insane. that's an insane person. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ carolina baby i'm coming home to you ♪ >> these days playing a new tune with his weekly ukele group. one of the hobbies he didn't use theed to have time for. as for his relationship with his father -- who passed away in 2011. he has the had some time to
2:53 am
>> it was really hard for him to express how proud he was. but my mother did tell me like he would follow my career and get really excited when, things wig going well. he wouldn't, maybe he dent even know that he wasn't telling me as much as he could have. but my mom said that he was really, really, happy. and so, i'm very fortunate that i got those moments before he passed. >> now, james franco is having something of a moment. with two golden globe nominations, and yes, oscar buzz. but he is bringing to it some new perspective. >> hard work does pay off. but what i didn't realize, you need, you need balance. and you cannot make your happiness contingent on work. or anything outside of you for that matter. right? it's got t
2:54 am
sounding cheesy, it's got to be a more spiritual thing. i didn't learn that until a year ha go.
2:55 am
2:56 am
2:57 am
michelle miller has our final story. michelle miller has a final story. it begins years ago with two desperate parents who hope to one day see their baby again. >> reporter: it was asome pull letter with a simple request. >> is it possible that in ten years you could meet us on this bridge. it was, so heartfelt. and i thought, oh, my. these birth parents went through a difficult time. >> reporter: the request to meet came from chinese parents who had abandoned their second born in a market. they violated china's one child policy. that child katie was adopted by michigan couple ken and ruth polar, the polars never forgot the note with katie's chinese name. when she turned 10 in 2005 they
2:58 am
the birth father was there. by chance, a chinese tv crew captured him on tape. >> holding a sign, the name on the sign is the name in the note. >> filmmaker, was so compelled by the story, he made a documentary about it. the story became famous in china. back in the u.s. the polars remained silent. >> you know, i asked my mom, whose tummy did i come from. i realize i'd didn't come from her tummy. >> this is really something quite big for her to deal with at this time in her life. >> the polars didn't tell katie until she was 20. >> they told my brother as the bout it. i was kind of the only one left in the dark. >> how did that make you feel? >> i was definitely upset for a little while.
2:59 am
but, yeah, whether or not it was the best way. i've don't know. but there really wasn't. a guidebook for how to approach this subject. >> this summer, katey finally got the chance to meet her birth parents. a week after her 22nd birthday. made overwhelming by the bare barriers of language and culture. >> are they real to you? >> yes they are real. >> still a family once lost has been found. michelle miller, grand rapid, michigan. >> that's the "overnight news" for this tuesday. for some of you've the news continues. for others check back with uts later for the morning news and of course, cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm jericka duncan.
3:00 am
>> announcer: this is the cbs "overnight news." it's hard to imagine a colder start to a year. it is dangerously cold in many parts of the country, nearly 90% of the lower 4 will wake up today to subfreezing temperatures. omaha, nebraska setting new year's day record at 20 degrees below zero. and williston, north dakota minus 31. we will have much more on the forecast in a moment. but we begin with hey new effort to address an issue that has dominated recent headlines. sexual harassment. dozens of high-profile men have been publicly shamed. now chief justice john roberts announced a new initiative to protect judicial employees from harassment. our chief legal correspondent, jan crawford.
3:01 am
>> reporter: the announcement two weeks after alex kazinsky, federal appeals judge stepped down amid wide ranging allegations of sexual harassment of female law clerks. in a "washington post" investigation, several female law clerks alleged a pattern of inappropriate behavior, including showing them pornography. on december 18th, after 30 years on the california based appeals court, abruptly retired. but he had been reprimanded before. in 2008 he apologized for storing sexually explicit material on publicly accessible website. he told lesley stahl last year on 60 minutes he should have been more careful. >> i had a bunch of stuff on the computer that i didn't lock it up. >> raunchy stuff?
3:02 am
>> some of it was raunchy. >> it came in the report on the state of the judiciary. he said events in recent months illuminated the depth of the problem of sexual harassment in the work place and without naming kazinsky said events in the past few weeks made clear the judiciary is not immune. roberts said the judiciary would undertake a careful evaluation of standard of conduct and procedures for handling harassment complaints. he directed a new working group to consider whether any changes are necessary. these concerns warrant serious attention from all quarters of the judicial branch, roberts wrote. now, jan, how exactly will this affect federal judges? >> well, i mean most appeals court judges they have young clerk. and they're also bound by con agreements. that could keep people from coming forward. last month 700 current and former law clerks and court employees sent ape letter to chief
3:03 am
handles sexual harassment complaints and confidentiality and reporting misconduct. >> jan crawford in washington. thank you. today, 300 of hollywood's most powerful women announced, plans to fight systematic sexual harassment. include, producer, shawnda rhymes and reese witherspoon. they call it time's up. a legal defense fund with $14 million in donations to help women in blue-collar jobs who face sexual misconduct. the group strives to reach gender parity at studios and talent agencies. >> of the temperature was 10 degrees when the ball came done here in new york's times square. the coldest new years in 100 years. and it is freezing in a lot of place that don't usually get that cold. meteorologist liz horton with our cbs station in miami. wfor. good evening, liz. >> the bitter cold continues throughout a lot of the country. dakotas, minneapolis, toward the gulf states, under wind chill advisory. wind chill warnings for areas in the midwest shaded in pink. f
3:04 am
much of the south. from texas all the way over to florida, areas tht are not used to dealing with such cold weather. teens and single digits will be felt there. tuesday's lows below zero from kansas city to the north. and the wind chill will make it feel even colder. minneapolis will feel more like 21 below when you wake up tuesday morning. 19 below in chicago. and as cold as 1 below in memphis. will feel like 10 in atlanta. tuesday's highs only in the teens and 20s. moderating slightly by wednesday. 30s and 40s for the south. and then, we start to worry about blizzard concerns, exiting out into the new england area. jericka. >> thank you, liz. from south florida's warmth, president trump heads back to the cold reality of d.c. politics to night and he'll face several important challenges in the new year. chip reid is traveling with the president. >> hello, everybody. happy new year. >> the president first lady,
3:05 am
baron and other family members welcome the the new year at the president's mar a lago club in palm beach. >> we will have a great year. fantastic 2018. >> asked for comment on north korean leader, kim jong-un's claim he has a nuclear button on his desk and missiles capable of hitting the u.s. president said only this. off off we'll see. we'll see. first tweet of the new year aimed at pakistan which he accused of lies and deceit and giving safe haven off to the terrorists we hunt in afghanistan. no more. pakistan fired back. noting its cooperation that decimated al qaeda over last 16 years. and accusing the u.s. of giving them nothing but invective and mistrust. >> the president visited the trump national golf club nine times and today. returning to washington he will face a litany of challenges including the government will run out of moneyua
3:06 am
raising threat of partial government shutdown. next weekend he will meet with republican congressional leaders at camp david to hash out 2018 legislative agenda. top priorities include massive investment in the nation's infrastructure. and, legislation to allow nearly 800,000 immigrants known as dreamers who came to the u.s. illegally as children to stay here permanent leap. looming over everything will be the special counsel investigation of the 2016 election and possible involvement of the trump campaign. the new york times reported, former campaign aide papadopoulos, told a australian diplomat russia had political dirt on hillary clinton. information that was then passioned on -- passed on to the u.s. a knowledgeable former u.s. official tells cbs news that
3:07 am
information that was provided by australia was "key" to u.s. investigators in realizing that russia might be attempting to interfere significantly in the u.s. election. jericka. >> chip reid, thank you very much. the cbs "overnight news" will be right back.
3:08 am
3:09 am
3:10 am
>> this is the cbs "overnight news." the president has also been tweeting his support for protesters in iran. they have taken to the streets for five straight days fed up with a bad economy and government corruption. state media says 12 people have been killed. elizabeth palmer covered the last big protests in iran in 2009. she joins us from london. you know what is behind the unrest? >> well, it started very small. on thursday, in the regional city of mashad with a single demonstration against as you said economic hardship, especially the price of food. but overnight, it just morphed and spread like wildfire. to the capital, tehran, where crowd vandalized one of the main shopping avenues. and to dozens of smaller cities
3:11 am
across the country which is very unusual. now the protesters are especially young people and the working poor and they're angry about everything from corruption and unemployment to lack of freedom and religious rule. the police have broken up appropriate tests here and there with water cannons. they have arrested hundred of people. but we have not yet anyway seen the kind of violent crackdown in 2009 when security forces shot and killed people in the street for protesting election results. >> liz, how have authority handled the protests this time? >> president hassan rouhani, a moderate went on television with a surprisingly measured response. he said people did have a legitimate right to protest, as long as there was no violence. now, that may have been a warning to the security forces too, this is a volatile, dangerous situation. and he knows that hey lethal crackdown could send it spiraling out of control and could become a bloodbath.
3:12 am
>> elizabeth palmer in london. thank you. >> president trump signalled he is welling to extend protections for young immigrants brought into the country illegally. but on one condition -- last week he tweeted there can be no daca without the wall needed at the southern border. do walls really work? mark phillips went to were ln to find out. >> reporter: at this point you would have been in the car, coming this way? >> if anybody knows anything about walls it is probably hans peter spitsner. >> you would have approached checkpoint charlie. >> first time he was at checkpoint charlie was when help and daughter peggy would be the last people to escape across the berlin wall before it fell. >> a great dangerous for us. >> a tourist attraction now. but from its building by the old east german regime in 1961, the wall was a death zone almost three decade. while around, 5,000 people escaped across, through, and, over, or under it. at least 139 died trying. some death estimates run to over 1,000. hans peter was desperate. >> this is the car, i crossed
3:13 am
>> owned by american gi, now a family front. with his wife ingrid in the west allowed out for an aging aunt's birthday. with peggy 7 years old at the time, hans peter asked dozens of gis with access to east germany to smuggle them out. only eric yah agreed to hide them in his trunk. >> i said you are a member of my family. >> they have strong views about walls not just the berlin example now a living history lesson. whether it is here or the security barrier the israelis have built between them and the palestinians, or going back to the great wall of china, they see all walls as monuments to political failure. the berlin wall of course was different than all the others. others were designed to keep people out. and this one, designed
3:14 am
them in. there is one thing they all have in common though. critics will tell you though that when governments build walls, a sign that something else isn't working. >> it is always to keep someone in, keep someone out. keep someone from doing something. always a bad thing, really. the monument with the will that can always be overcome. >> i say never again. never again. please. >> mark phillips, cbs news, berlin. ♪ now some other stories we are following in our "evening
3:15 am
in colorado authorities identified 37-year-old matthew reel as the the man who fired more than 100 shots in his apartment at sheriff's deputies. deputy zachary parish was killed. four others wounded. reel was later killed by a swat team. >> investigators are trying to find out what caused a charter plen to crash in costa rica yesterday. ten americans among the 12 people killed. victims include a new york couple and their three sons as well as a family of four from florida. and in an odd twist, a hawaiian airlines jetliner took its passengers back in time. the jet left new zealand at 126789. 05 a.m., january 1st, after crossing the international date line it arrived eight hours later in honolulu, 10:13 a.m.,
3:16 am
december 31, 2017. now that it is 2018, thousands of new laws will take effect across the country. including one that could save you a jaywalking ticket. >> taking the plunge. to start the year, it is not for the feint of heart. >> a simple letter with a simple request. >> i asked my mom, whose tummy did i come from? they told my brothers about it. i was the only one left in the dark. ♪ harry's meeting clients... ...from far away. but they only see his wrinkles. if only harry used some... ...bounce, to dry. he would be a less wrinkly, winning guy. (alex trebek) $over $8,000. now, why is this number so important? because $8,508 is the average cost of a funeral.
3:17 am
how to help cover your final expenses, like this one, great. but if you haven't, i'm here to tell you about the number one most popular whole life insurance plan through the colonial penn program. if you're between age 50 and 85, you can start here, right now. so call now. you won't be alone. over half a million people called last year for free information. options start at $9.95 a month, a good price if you're on a tight budget. there are no health questions and no medical exam. your acceptance is guaranteed. best of all, your rate is locked in for life and can never go up for any reason. plus a 30-day money back guarantee. so call now for free information, and you'll also get this free beneficiary planner, and it's yours free just for calling. so call now.
3:18 am
try degree ultraclear black + white ♪ saves your white clothes from yellow stains and black clothes from white marks still with 48 hour sweat protection. try degree ultraclear black + white it won't let you down the new year brings new laws around the country.
3:19 am
in oakland, california, marked the start of legal sales of marijuana in the state. california its the 8th largest state to legalize pot for recreational uses. jamie yuccas reports on what else has changed. >> workers trying to scrape by are getting a raise. minimum wage is raising in 18 states. maine to california. also in the golden state, pot shops can now open for business. california is the largest state to allow recreational use of marijuana. for those caught up in the battle between local police and federal immigration agents, california is now a sanctuary state. police will not be allowed to ask about immigration status or hold any one for deportation unless that person has been convicted of a crime. in california, this used to be
3:20 am
now you can cross the street once the countdown clock starts. in other states, high school coaches must be trained to spot concussions, aimed at better protecting athletes. teens in colorado face a crackdown on texting. illinois, who gets the dog in a divorce? like children, judges will determine sole or joint custody for pets, who gets to claim them on their taxes? maybe congress can pass that later this year. >> iceland has become the first nation to require equal pay. as of today, it is illegal for icelandic companies with 25 or more workers to pay women less than men for the same work. when we come back, new year celebrations gone wrong.
3:21 am
the great emperor trekking a hundred miles inland to their breeding grounds. except for these two fellows. this time next year, we're gonna be sitting on an egg. i think we're getting close!
3:22 am
.. man, we are never gonna breed. just give it a second. you will arrive in 92 days. nah, nuh-uh. nope, nope, nope. you know who i'm gonna follow? my instincts. as long as gps can still get you lost, you can count on geico saving folks money. i'm breeding, man. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. california, and featured 39 colorful floats covered in flowers and show horses and marching bands. new year's celebrations struck the right note, across the country. this was nashville. and in las vegas, fireworks welcomed 2018. more than 300,000 revellers packed the strip and free mont street under unprecedented security. some celebrations did go wrong. in australia, a barge filled with fireworks caught fire and exploded. forcing people on shore to scatter.
3:23 am
and in russia, an 80 foot christmas tree became a towering inferno after catching fire during an outdoor concert. no one was hurt. >> brave swimmers around the world welcomed newt year with a plunge. in new york more than 1,000 swimmers joined the coney island polar bear club for a dip in the atlantic ocean. ice welcomed revellers in wisconsin, and in the netherlands, hundreds put on red hats before diving into the chilly north sea. >> the coast guard just released video of a dramatic rescue, of panama city, florida. an 89-year-old man had driven off a pier on saturday. guard members broke the car's window and pulled the driver to safety. >> we have new lives to celebrate. parents jenika lynch and davonte welcomed their son, the first american baby born in 2018.
3:24 am
6 pound, 15 ounces. he was born two second past midnight in guam. up next, proof that parental love endures. even when separated by many miles and decades.
3:25 am
3:26 am
3:27 am
michelle miller has a final story. it begins years ago with two desperate parents who hope to one day see their baby again. >> reporter: it was asome pull letter with a simple request. >> is it possible that in ten years you could meet us on this bridge. it was, so heartfelt. and i thought, oh, my. these birth parents went through a difficult time. >> reporter: the request to meet came from chinese parents who had abandoned their second born in a market. they violated china's one child policy. that child katie was adopted by michigan couple ken and ruth polar, the polars never forgot the note with katie's chinese name.
3:28 am
the birth father was there. by chance, a chinese tv crew captured him on tape. >> holding a sign, the name on the sign is the name in the note. >> filmmaker, was so compelled by the story, he made a documentary about it. the story became famous in china. back in the u.s. the polars remained silent. >> you know, i asked my mom, whose tummy did i come from. i realize i'd didn't come from her tummy. >> this is really something quite big for her to deal with at this time in her life. >> the polars didn't tell katie until she was 20. >> they told my brother as the bout it. i was kind of the only one left in the dark. >> how did that make you feel? >> i was definitely upset for a little while. but, yeah, whether or not it was the best way. i don't know. but there really wasn't. a guidebook for how to approach this subject.
3:29 am
got the chance to meet her birth parents. a week after her 22nd birthday. made overwhelming by the bare barriers of language and culture. >> are they real to you? >> yes they are real. >> still a family once lost has been found. michelle miller, grand rapid, michigan. >> that's the "overnight news" for this tuesday. for some of you've the news continues. for others check back with us later for the morning news and of course, cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm jericka duncan.
3:30 am
welcome to the "overnight news." i'm jericka duncan. president trump is starting the new year back at the white house after ringing in 2018 at his private club in florida. with the holiday festivities over. the president has a full plate of work on his desk from hammering legislative goals to several global flash-points. here's chip reid. >> hello, everybody. happy new year. >> the president, first lady, melania, trump, baron and other family members welcomed the new year at the president's mar a lago club in palm beach. >> wll
3:31 am
korean leader, kim jong-un's claim he has a nuclear button on his desk and missiles capable of hitting the u.s. president said only this. >> we'll see. we'll see. first tweet of the new year aimed at pakistan which he accused of lies and deceit and giving safe haven off to the terrorists we hunt in afghanistan. no more. pakistan fired back. noting its cooperation that decimated al qaeda over last 16 years. and accusing the u.s. of giving them nothing but invective and mistrust. >> the president visited the trump national golf club nine times and today. this evening, returning to washington he will face a litany of challenges including the government will run out of money january 19, raising threat of partial government shutdown. next weekend he will meet with republican congressional leaders at camp david to hash out 2018 legislative agenda. top priorities include massive investment in the nation's infrastructure. and, legislation to allow nearly 800,000 immigrants known as
3:32 am
dreamers who came to the u.s. illegally as children to stay here permanent leap. looming over everything will be the special counsel investigation of the 2016 election and possible involvement of the trump campaign. the new york times reported, former campaign aide papadopoulos, told a australian diplomat russia had political dirt on hillary clinton. information that was then passed on to the u.s. a knowledgeable former u.s. official tells cbs news that information that was provided by australia was "key" to u.s. investigators in realizing that russia might be attempting to interfere significantly in the u.s. election. jericka. >> chip reid, thank you very much. the president has been tweeting support for protes
3:33 am
in iran. they have take tine the streets for five straight days, fed up with a bad economy and government corruption. state media says 12 people have been killed. elizabeth palmer covered the last big protest in iran in 2009 and she joins us from london you. know what its behind the unrest? >> well, it started very small. on thursday, in the regional city of mashad with a single demonstration against as you said economic hardship, especially the price of food. but overnight, it just morphed and spread like wildfire. to the capital, tehran, where crowd vandalized one of the main shopping avenues. and to dozens of smaller cities across the country which is very unusual. now the protesters are especially young people and the working poor and they're angry about everything from corruption and unemployment to lack of freedom and religious rule. the police have broken up fro tests here and there with water cannons. they have arrested hundred of people. but we have not yet anyway seen
3:34 am
2009 when security forces shot and killed people in the street for protesting election results. >> liz, how have authority handled the protests this time? >> president hassan rouhani, a moderate went on television with a surprisingly measured response. he said people did have a legitimate right to protest, as long as there was no violence. now, that may have been a warning to the security forces too, this is a volatile, dangerous situation. and he knows that hey lethal crackdown could send it spiraling out of control and could become a bloodbath. >> elizabeth palmer in london. thank you. >> president trump signalled he is welling to extend protections for young immigrants brought into the country illegally. but on one condition -- last week he tweeted there can be no daca without the desperately needed wall at the southern border.
3:35 am
mark phillips went to were ln to find out. >> reporter: at this point you would have been in the car, coming this way? >> if anybody knows anything about walls it is probably hans peter spitsner. >> you would have approached checkpoint charlie. >> first time he was at checkpoint charlie was when help and daughter peggy would be the last people to escape across the berlin wall before it fell. >> a great dangerous for us. >> a tourist attraction now. but from its building by the old east german regime in 1961, the wall was a death zone almost three decade. while around, 5,000 people escaped across, through, and, over, or under it. at least 139 died trying. some death estimates run to over 1,000. hans peter was desperate. >> this is the car, i crossed
3:36 am
the border. >> owned by american gi, now a family front. with his wife ingrid in the west allowed out for an aging aunt's birthday. with peggy 7 years old at the time, hans peter asked dozens of gis with access to east germany to smuggle them out. only eric yah agreed to hide them in his trunk. >> i said you are a member of my family. >> they have strong views about walls not just the berlin example now a living history lesson. whether it is here or the security barrier the israelis have built between them and the palestinians, or going back to the great wall of china, they see all walls as monuments to political failure. the berlin wall of course was different than all the others. others were designed to keep people out. and this one, designed to keep
3:37 am
there is one thing they all have in common though. critics will tell you though that when governments build walls, a sign that something else isn't working. >> it is always to keep someone in, keep someone out. keep someone from doing something. always a bad thing, really. the monument with the will that can always be overcome. >> i say never again. never again. please. >> mark phillips, cbs news, berlin. >> the cbs "overnight news" will be right back.
3:38 am
i just want to find a used car without getting ripped off. you could start your search at the all-new carfax.com that might help. show me the carfax. now the car you want and the history you need are easy to find. show me used trucks with one owner. pretty cool. [laughs] ah... ahem... show me the carfax. start your used car search and get free carfax reports at the all-new carfax.com.
3:39 am
i ...prilosec otc 7 years ago,my doctor recommended... 5 years ago, last week. just 1 pill each morning, 24 hours and zero heartburn. it's been the number 1 doctor recommended brand for 10... ...straight years, and it's still recommended today. use as directed.
3:40 am
getting in shape is always a top new year's resolution. if you are looking for a new workout strategy. superstar quarterback tom brady is sharing his secrets to success. at 40 years old, brady is not slowing down in a game dominated by younger players. the five time super bowl champ reveals his fitness and diet regimen in his new book, the tb 12 method huh to achieve a lifetime of sustained peak performance. published by simon and schuster, division of cbs. >> some people want denser muscles. as the an athlete, i don't want them. i want them strong and active and pliable. >> you descrpl
3:41 am
lengthening and softening of the muscles. everybody thinks they want muscles to be harder. >> we have been educated on. i have seen really strong, physically fit guys the definition of health that are ones injured the most. if i can keep my muscles pliable, i can, hopefully, you know, limit the intensity or limit injerry altogether. you know if i do absorb some of the forces. >> on average, a professional football player lasts just six years in the nfl. compare that to brady who is just wrapping up his 18th regular season. he credits his longevity to a more holistic approach to fitness. >> we talk rehab all the time. we get injured. we go to rehab. you talk about pliability in terms of, prehab. >> yeah. >> meaning, pliability can
3:42 am
>> yeah. not just athletes but for everybody. everyone, my parents could do it. my sisters can do it. i did pliability this morning on my son whose leg was sore. he is 8 years old. >> trying to make the case, pliability a whole different way to look at athleticism. >> a philosophy he adopted after meeting long time trainer and business parter alex guchlt errero. >> you describe alex not as a body coach but body engineer? >> yeah, when my elbow was in pain. basically every day. alex, through his treatments, in 2004, he started lengthening and softening all of the muscle in my forearm. it took away the tension in the muscle i was like god that makes so much sense. the band here. >> pliability can be achieved in a lot of band work? >> band work will, increase your strength. while, limiting the density of the muscle. the denser the muscle means the less ply built its. most of our workouts are, all
3:43 am
>> brady any sports therapy center doesn't look like an average gym. 90% of the training is done with flexible bands. followed by specific massage technique to foal cuss on problem areas of the body. >> i would say i am faster now and quicker now than when i first started playing football, in high school. >> you are faster at age 40 than 18. >> yeah, i am. >> all my friend who are, moms are going to be saying to their husband. like tom brady is better at 40 than he was at 18. all of these band in their christmas. >> there should be. >> you really want to play into your mid 40s? >> yeah. that's the goal for me. >> does giselle agree with that? >> i think we go back and forth. she will say, ten years ago you told me ten years. now it's ten years. now you are saying another, five years. >> do you worry about concussions? >> i don't worry about them. no, i am not oblivious to them. some of my idols had to retire because of head injuries. yeah, i'm conscious of it. i love the sport, i will keep playing. i will do everything to ta
3:44 am
sunday. >> the cbs "overnight news" will be right back.
3:45 am
mary had a little lamb whose fleece was white as snow. but after an electrical fire from faulty wiring, mary's vintage clothing and designer shoe collection were ruined. luckily, the geico insurance agency had recently helped mary with renters insurance, and she got a totally fab replacement wardrobe
3:46 am
at bloomingdale's. mary was inspired to start her own fashion line, exclusively for little lambs. visit geico.com and see how affordable renters insurance can be. my friend susie cracks and hello sensitive bladder. ring a bell? then you have to try always discreet. i didn't think protection this thin could work. but the super absorbent core turns liquid to gel. for incredible protection... ...that's surprisingly thin. so it's out of sight... ...and out of mind. always discreet. for bladder leaks. also in liners.
3:47 am
♪ saves your white clothes from yellow stains and black clothes from white marks still with 48 hour sweat protection. try degree ultraclear black + white it won't let you down with the holidays in the rearview mirror, hollywood is looking forward to award season. one of the names getting early oscar buzz is actor james franco. being praised for a movie that tell the story of another film, a cult classic considered to be one of the worst movies ever made. here's tony dokoupil. >> there are a lot of things i would look to do other than watch a bad movie for two hours. there are hundreds of people in there. why are people packed for this. >> you will see. they all. it is -- it is an event.
3:48 am
>> this is a midnight screening of "the room." a 2003 film so bad it is almost good. >> you are lying. i never hit you. you are tearing me apart, lisa! >> it is considered one of the worst movies of all time. and this guy, tommy wazou, the director and star has become a cult hero. 14 years later, his film is still in theaters. >> you really going to make the thing? >> we are going to, yeah. >> hey! >> what any more, wazou and his critical flop are the subject of a new film, that's a critical darling. >> this is my movie. this is my life. >> the disaster artist. directed by, and starring, james franco. >> you have a malevolent presence. you are perfect villain. i could see you as dracula.
3:49 am
>> he introduced franco's to the room's fans. >> james franco. right here. >> franco decided to address them in wasou's curious accent. >> everyone close your eye and see if you know who talking. i think tommy is artist, you know, i look to tell story about artist, great artist. >> franco too is an artist. and a serious one. you may mav seen him in spiderman. if only i could cause you the pain that you caused me. or, his oscar nominated role in 127 hours. >> ah! >> but he has also written fiction and poetry. and staged art exhibitions over the course of his two decade long career. >> james. >> today franco now almost 40, says he is slowing down. and putting a new focus on -- franco. >> we have been surfing what five months now. >> yeah. >> two weeks ago hgo
3:50 am
surfboard and invited us along for its maiden voyage. to hear him tell it, the new james franco swims with a different kind of hollywood shark. >> this fin, like jaws, pops up, like, from here to look right over there. >> are you telling me a story right now about a shark appearing on your very first day out as the a surfer. are you kidding me? >> no. >> wow. >> no fin sightings this time. but itch you look closely, franco barely escapes my wobbly first ride of the day. his board wasn't so lucky. >> brand new board. virgin, virgin session. tony sliced it. >> you could say franco's wild ride began as a restless teen in northern, california. >> by the tame i was 17 -- yeah, i was -- i was on probation. a ward of the court.
3:51 am
outlet for his energy. >> i needed it. when i stopped acting ow and getting arested. i threw all that energy into art. >> in fact, he dropped out of college, to pursue acting. and franco's parents, especially, his father, thought their eldest son was being foolish. >> if you want to be -- an artist, of any kind, like, like, people are not going to beg you to do it. you have to want to do it. you have to put in the work. you have to prove it. my parents didn't believe in me. you know it is look i had to, do it. >> franco's career, took off. from the outside looking at that, people are thinking, guys got it all.
3:52 am
money. success. >> yeah, but. >> but. >> sound like you have a but. >> i was at this point where -- i was really depressed. like you said from an outside perspective. looked like, hey i have got this great career. but i was depressed. >> reporter: in search of relief. franco became a student in 2007. in typical franco fashion he didn't get one degree, he got seven. let's not forget he was still acting, directing, and teaching, at several universities. >> at one point i was doing a broadway play of mice and men. acting in a film. and on my day off mondays, i was flying back to l.a. and teaching at three schools. and, so, that is insane. that's an insane person. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ carolina baby i'm coming home to you ♪ >> these days playing a new tune with his weekly ukele group. one of the hobbies he didn't use theed to have time for. as for his relationship with his father -- who passed away in 2011.
3:53 am
he has the had some time to ponder that as well. >> it was really hard for him to express how proud he was. but my mother did tell me like he would follow my career and get really excited when, things wig going well. he wouldn't, maybe he dent even know that he wasn't telling me as much as he could have. but my mom said that he was really, really, happy. and so, i'm very fortunate that i got those moments before he passed. >> now, james franco is having something of a moment. with two golden globe nominations, and yes, oscar buzz. but he is bringing to it some new perspective. >> hard work does pay off. but what i didn't realize, you need, you need balance. and you cannot make your happiness contingent on work.
3:54 am
or anything outside of you for that matter. right? it's got to be a -- risk of sounding cheesy, it's got to be a more spiritual thing. i didn't learn that until a year
3:55 am
>> i'm alex trebek. if you're age 50 to 85, i have an important message about security. write down the number on your screen, so you can call when i finish. the lock i want to talk to you about isn't the one on your door. this is a lock for your life insurance, a rate lock, that guarantees your rate can never go up at any time, for any reason. but be careful. many policies you see do not have one, but you can get a lifetime rate lock through the colonial penn program. call this number to learn more. this plan was designed with a rate lock for people on a fixed income who want affordable life insurance that's simple to get. coverage options for just $9.95 a month, less than 35 cents a day. act now and your rate will be locked in for life.
3:56 am
it will never increase, guaranteed. this is lifelong coverage that can never be cancelled as long as you pay your premiums, guaranteed. and your acceptance is guaranteed, with no health questions. you cannot be turned down because of your health. call for your information kit and read about this rate lock for yourself. you'll also get a free gift with great information both are free, with no obligation, so don't miss out. call for information, then decide. read about the 30 day, 100 percent money back guarantee. don't wait, call this number now. ♪
3:57 am
ople take action against housing discrimination? my friends were told they might be more comfortable in another neighborhood. my co-worker was pressured by her landlord to pay her rent with sexual favors. my neighbor was told she needs to get rid of her dog, even though he's an assistance animal. they all reported these forms of housing discrimination. when you don't report them, landlords and owners
3:58 am
housing discrimination is illegal. if you think you've been a victim, report it. like we did. narrator: if you suspect that you've been discriminated against because of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, familial status or disability, report it to hud or your local fair housing center. visit hud.gov/fairhousing or call the hud hotline at 1-800-669-9777. fair housing is your right. use it.
3:59 am
4:00 am
it's tuesday, january 2nd, 2018. this is the cbs morning news. anti government protesters in iran take to the streets for a sixth day leaving more dead in clashes with security forces. olympic bridge, south korea and north korea could soon come together for high level talks on participation in the winter games. and a brutal cold snap grips the u.s. closing schools, freezing lakes and sealing cars in a layer of ice. it's an arctic blast that will have people shivering most of the week.

51 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on