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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  October 15, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. our latest headlines... the president of the bulgarian football union resigns after last night's england match was marred by racist chants. more on that in a moment. the eu's chief negotiator, michel barnier, says there's a "narrow path" to a brexit deal today at two. bulgaria's prime this week, but the two sides have minister calls for the boss of their to agree the details by the end of today. football association to resign after reaching an agreement, england footballers are racially er, is still possible. abused in a european qualifier. we could be criticised for not going obviously any agreement far enough, but i think we have made a huge statement. frankly, we are in must work for everyone. an impossible situation to get it right for everybody. the clock is ticking, the message snp leader nicola sturgeon tells her party conference that from the eu's michel barnier, it is a second referendum on scottish independence must hapen next year. possible but difficult, and a legal text needs to be finalised today. reaching an agreement is still conference, i say enough. enough of governments scotland did not vote possible. obviously, any agreement for imposing policies we do not must work for everyone.
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and back in your bonuses, mps called support. on former thomas cook boss is to do the right thing after the travel firm collapsed with debts of £1.7 all going smooth, let's get the sport with will perry. let's talk billion. and coming up, all of the sport with about the fallout from those a will perry. coming up, we will have all of the disgraceful scenes last night in fallout from last night's events in sofia. the uefa president has been sofia, bulgaria in that game against bulgaria and england. also the speaking after the abuse of england latest from the england and wales for all players in bulgaria which caps for the rugby world cup in japan. see you later. included nazi salutes. they said thanks, and darren is looking at the weather for us. they need to wage war on these we have much—needed dry weather racists and uefa claims it is doing today. the sunshine is even out, as well. more rain in the forecast, we everything it can to eradicate what will look at that later as well as it calls the disease from football. the head of the bulgarian football how close we came yesterday evening union has resigned owing pressure to getting some very dangerous and damaging weather. more later on. from the prime minister to do so. they have also culled from bulgaria see you later, darren, thank you. to be expelled from euro 2020 the duke and duchess of cambridge meet imran khan, a friend of qualifying which would make little difference because they are bottom william's late mother, on the first of the group and cannot quote i put them on. earlier i spoke to a journalist based in sofia told me it full day of their visit to the is only the manner of the 6—0 defeat which is axing making the headlines country. there. the headlines here are
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focusing more on the defeat bulgaria suffered in the game. that was this is afternoon live. once again a expected but still the headlines football match is dominated by not what happened on the pitch but off this morning of the defeat for it. the disgraceful scenes in sofia, bulgaria and the problems of bulgaria last night have sparked international condemnation with bulgarian football are exposed and pressure on the bulgarian football chief to resign and that pressure is then the focus on racism was only coming from his own prime minister. coming second paragraph of the england players were consistently second headline, which i think shows racially abused in the european qualifier, a game which england won that people haven't yet realised the gravity of the situation, the 6-0 but it qualifier, a game which england won 6—0 but it had to be halted twice because of the abuse. borisjohnson seriousness this is going to have on national level. raheem sterling has has described the behaviour of some bulgarian supporters as vile. but we have been there before and racism been on twitter to praise the bulgarian prime minister for asking isn't confined to international for the head of the bulgarian matches, some football pundits now argue that if it happens again the football union to step down. it was supposed to be all about the players should just be taken off the pitch. joe wilson reports. you could football, in which an fiasco last thing we are talking about today. not for the first time, probably not for the last, but let's change games say this game began with marcus rashford's blistering finish for and talk about the rugby world cup. this goal, but it began before that, two rug by it began when england's player is and talk about the rugby world cup. two rugby quarterfinals. wales and first heard the monkey chanting.
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france playing, history there. two rugby quarterfinals. wales and france playing, history therem should be a cracker but wales will be driven on by the pain of their 2011 world cup semifinal defeat against france when they faced them in some doubtquarterfinal injapan. that's according to the backs coach i mean, i heard it before i even stephenjones who missed the got to the other side conversion of the welsh lost 9—8 of the pitch in the warm up, so we spoke about it such a narrative defeat in new zealand for the best remedy for the coming off the pitch after the warm up and then, jim wells cup in new zealand for the obviously, it was happening best remedy for the then wales in the game but, like i said, captaina best remedy for the then wales captain a red card. wales beat it's difficult to categorize france again on sunday forjust the the whole country. second time at a world cup. i think it's perhaps a minority and the second half was a lot better, france again on sunday forjust the so perhaps a victory all round. second time at a world cupm france again on sunday forjust the second time at a world cup. it was a tight game, even when we were down uefa, who i've spoken to throughout the game — to 14 we battled hard and it could at half—time and at the end have gone either way. but this is of the game — will be carrying out a thorough investigation, not just what the ref saw and what the officials around him different good players. some of them saw, but also live footage, witness statements to make sure that this appalling we re different good players. some of them were that day but the vast majority scene of terrible racism not, the recent games against is treated appropriately. france, they have had some good there were intense discussions success. it will be a different between england players, challenge on sunday. the opposition management and officials through the first half and an announcement was made we respect and rightly so because to the crowd that the referee might they are talented players, but it is suspend the game if abuse continued. about us getting our house in order it was greeted by boos. and making sure we know our roles
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and making sure we know our roles and response abilities. good news there were nazi for england ahead of their world cup salutes in the ground. quarterfinal against australia on when england's players left saturday, the day before wales take this pitch at half time, on the french. england's number they then actually discussed whether they should even eight billy vunipola is now very carry on with the match. likely to fit to start according to they decided to play on and england's captain the defence coach mitchell. he told me he believes injured his ankle against argentina that was the right decision. ten yea rs everyone wanted us to carry injured his ankle against argentina ten years ago but you've to returning. england have beaten the on and do the talking on the pitch, wallabies in the last six meetings which i'm extremely proud of. but haven't won a world cup knockout it's not easy to play in circumstances like that, game for 12 years. britain's world but the 6—0 finish and the way we played, the manner in which we played, i'm extremely proud of, for sure. heptathlon champion katarina johnson—thompson has been today nominated for the iaaf athlete of england's manager felt they had handled the situation in the best way. i'm incredibly proud the word. she won her first global of all of the players and all of the staff. outdoor title of the world i don't think... chairmanships in doha with the british record. also won the european indoor pentathlon title of course, we could be criticised backin european indoor pentathlon title back in march. jamaica's shelly ann for not going far enough, fraser pryce huston to the gold in but i think we've made a huge statement and, frankly, we were in an impossible doha was also among the 11 nominees. situation to get it right to the satisfaction of everybody. but bulgaria's manager gave england's all—rounderjenny gunn has announced her retirement from a different perspective. international cricket today. the translation: i was totally second most capped female player concentrated on the game.
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i didn't actually hear anything, across all formats. 259 times for a but i've just talked to the english country, part of the 2017 winning press offices and i told them that world cup side as well. the ecb's if this is proven to be true, then we will have to be ashamed and apologize for it. managing director of women's cricket but once again, firstly, so she was an exceptional role model for the sport and will be dearly it has to be proven to be true. missed. finally andy murray is due one answer to the abuse in court in the first round of the was the scoreline. european open and lighter but he commentator: up towards kane. might have to leave the tournament manager gareth southgate has openly early because his third child is due acknowledged that english football has its own issues to deal with, this month and he will return to but racism was displayed london with his wife does matter in its starkest, most when she goes into labour. he says blatant form in bulgaria. he will take a month off and the england's players exposed it, baby arrives. he is scheduled to but the reaction can't stop here. play someone at six 30p this it is worth remembering evening. that as all the sport. more for at half five. that the bulgarian football authorities were angry when england even brought up the issue of racism in the build up to this game. now on afternoon live, let's go nationwide and see what's we heard bulgaria's manager tell us happening around the country there was not an issue in this in our daily visit to the bbc country with racism. newsrooms around the uk. clearly, racism stretches way beyond bulgaria, but nothing was ever changed in a spirit of denial. peter levy is in hull and we'll be joe wilson, bbc news, in sofia. talking to him about residents in lincolnshire who are tired of flooding in the region.
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with you and just a moment. and huw thomas is in cardiff he'll the story is developing, we are be talking to us about the premier of a new film in wales tonight hearing from our colleagues in bulgaria, they are reporting that and explaining why one of the stars the president of the bulgarian was seen at a local karaoke bar. football union has resigned. that in more there in just a moment. the last few minutes. we are also peter, we only talk to you about getting a statement from the uefa this a couple of weeks ago. the same story, flooding again and looking president, who says there were times chairand not long ago when the football story, flooding again and looking chair and this is as in ruskington family felt the scourge of racism suffering for the second time. you was a distant memory, the last couple of years have taught us that are right, it is really cruel. such thinking was at best ruskington in lincolnshire flooded for the second time in two weeks. complacent. he says our sanctions once again residents were wading are amongst... at the moment the through water again this morning. these pictures on this morning. many minimum sanction is a partial locals had already boxed up their belongings and brought in closure of the stadium. uefa is the only association willing to ban a dehumidifiers from the last time a couple of weeks ago, but again player for ten matches, the overnight the drainage system became only association willing to ban a playerfor ten matches, the most severe punishment in the game. uefa overwhelmed by heavy rainfall. the is committed to doing everything it can to eliminate this disease from bottom line is that this part of the football, believe me. he calls on world has had way above average football, believe me. he calls on football associations and rainfall and the ground is governments to do more in this area, as well. the referee was following saturated. it has to be said i was reading about this this morning, not
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just looking chair, many parts of uefa's 3—step racism protocol. the the country are in the same boat at first incident occurred on the 28th the country are in the same boat at the moment. two weeks ago items were minute when england were leading destroyed by the floods. once again afarming company 2-0. the minute when england were leading 2—0. the stadium announcement was destroyed by the floods. once again a farming company has been brought made condemning the abuse and warned in to help pump out the properties. fa ns made condemning the abuse and warned fans a further abuse continued the match might be abandoned. the game it was not a bad as last time. but was stopped againjust match might be abandoned. the game was stopped again just before half—time and was restarted after discussions between the officials just imagine being flooded twice, this has happened to roy and jean and the england manager, gareth southgate. a number of bulgarian allen. this is them. last time we fa ns southgate. a number of bulgarian fans who were making racist chance and gestures and then left the stadium. ifa came to accept it, this time it is and gestures and then left the stadium. if a third incident had occurred the game would have been absolutely frustrating that it has totally abandoned. we can speak to happened again. obviously we want the former watford and england assurances it is never going to happen again. the only coach that is formerfor the —— dry as the one i'm wearing the the former watford and england former for the —— ambassador for moment. it is a form of cruelty, kick it out. hejoins me from aylesbu ry. kick it out. hejoins me from aylesbury. what was your reaction as isn't it? it is, yes. i have one dry you saw what was going on? coat, the one i am wearing, and i disbelief. i played in bulgaria in might be wearing it forevermore. how the under 21 is a must be almost 42 they put a brave face on it i don't really know but it is a reflection yea rs the under 21 is a must be almost 42 years ago. i stood in the tunnel. i of where we have been before. but was getting that sort of vile then we just want assurances that would happen again and alone can give them that. yes and your output
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treatment from some of their players as we stood in the tunnel waiting to come out to play the game. to think putting on a brave face. lincolnshire has had a bad yearfor flooding. last time there was we are so many years later, it still serious flooding it made headline goes on, and more to the point the news when many homes were flooded in coach denies they have racism at all when feet. that was back in june. in their country. that is beyond this was the river sleeping, the disappointment. i think it is bank theirfirst this was the river sleeping, the just... talk about sticking your bank their first and we saw those head in the sand! i'm just looking pictures of the copter is being at the statement from the uefa brought in to try and stem but water president. he says the rise of coming through the breach in the nationalism across the continent has fuelled some unacceptable behaviour. river steeping. they had a month's he is blaming that, sort of. no rain in 48 hours. it is interesting about today is that every farmer has doubt about it, it plays a part, but, you know, football is somewhere said this morning that this isn't —— normally you can go to forget about everything else going on in the any farmer has said it isn't about world, and it's just everything else going on in the world, and it'sjust about everything else going on in the world, and it's just about what goes blame or neglect, it is about a on on the football pitch. your change in the climate. you do hear that story now or that opinion very disappointment of winning the game, often. if it has not happened to you you should express that in the ways you cannot imagine how you must feel to see your property and all your they have... those are just excuses belongings ruined. positions, many to paper over the problems. there
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things irreplaceable, like photos, was a moment when you thought you it is very heartbreaking. when i was have got to take the players off. down there, you will remember in absolutely. yes. the fact the june, everybody welcome does even protocols is the first time you announce it, they did, they though the last thing they probably continued the game, then the second wa nted though the last thing they probably wanted to see was television crews and cameras. people like you said time gareth southgate said we have four minutes until half—time, let we re and cameras. people like you said were upbeat and positive. it is see it through until half—time and amazing. it is. the other thing, we we will discuss it in the dressing room and see what they wanted to do. all think it will sort itself when it dries out, there is the smell, i thought that's a good way of doing the damage done, it was unafraid to. it. but uefa and the officials could we had the floods here in 2009, 2007 have taken control of all of that. if they really wanted to have sent a message, taking it out of the hands we had the title surge in 2013, of the players and the england hundreds of homes were flooded in management, said the game is off, it 2013 in hull and people were out of is over, because we won't tolerate their homes and living sometimes in that. they could have done that. i ca rava ns their homes and living sometimes in caravans on their drive for months think that would have sent a real and it took months and months before message to everyone that they are they were allowed back into their homes. does the most awful thing. taking it seriously. anybody who was at the game knew exactly who was they were allowed back into their homes. does the most awfulthing. my doing what was going on and gareth heart goes out to those people. as southgate pointed them out. the tv do all of ours. more on your show cameras caught them as they were walking out of the stadium. what tonight at 6:30pm on bbc one. thank should happen to them? the thing is, you. let's go to cardiff. the
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i don't believe that the bulgarians premier of his dark materials. it themselves would do much about it. because they are at the moment won't has been filming in your area. what accept there is an issue. it is good is going on? you'll a huge to see that the prime minister has operation, occupied the biggest film actually come out and said, you studio in wales and drawn on an army know, the display from last night of crews and actors from wales and beyond. the tb adaptation of his brought disgrace on to football and it has broken their football, and whatever, but they need to follow it dark materials has been years in the making is and stars people like ruth up. they need to follow it up by taking sanctions against all of wilson and james mcavoy and daphne those individuals. you wonder if keane as well as the broadway actor those individuals. you wonder if those individuals. you wonder if those individuals are actually football supporters or whether they lin manuelmiranda. it keane as well as the broadway actor lin manuel miranda. it is said to be went there just to cause the problem the most expensive drama the bbc has that they did, because that is ever made. much of that comes down to the ambition to do justice to something we know happens. that's philip pullman's nobles. the crew turn to the positive. whatever the has been out on location in wales to decision, keeping them on the pitch, places like blaenavon, where on a right or wrong, that result, 6—0, teach somebody something, doesn't snowy day many extras joint to shoot it? it teaches them that you can shout whatever but that's the same the opening scene of the series was that when they haven't been up a message myself and players of my era mountain or occupier a car so they have recreated these vast sets and played under. that was in england, virtual worlds in a big studio down as well. we played through all of in splott in cardiff. all this is that stuff. the message should be happening during what some people
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say is a golden age of drama simple now, it isn't tolerated production in wales which began when whatsoever, and will not be tolerated. that is what uefa, fifa a doctor who was revived and began filming in cardiff over ten years and our own fa have come out and ago. his dark materials is certainly said now. if this happens ever again the biggest drama to be made in wales in terms of its budget. also the scale of the project. you the players should leave the pitch and not return. regardless of what mentioned lin manuel miranda, and u efa and not return. regardless of what uefa are saying. thank you very much. the european union plus mecca chief ...he he plays lee's closing in the series and we find out how much he brexit negotiator says a deal needs to be agreed overnight and needs to loves wales. about a year ago when he posted but all his trips on social media. every weekend he was be signed off on thursday. michel out and about to a lot of castles, barnier says a deal would be difficult to achieve but is still places like a famous book town and possible as long as the legal text then he popped up on a night out. he is agreed today. it comes after the made a surprise appearance at a uk put forward new proposals for monthly musicals karaoke night that customs arrangements. downing street happens at a small bar in cardiff. says boris johnson customs arrangements. downing street says borisjohnson is aware of the time constraints and wants to make it is fairto happens at a small bar in cardiff. it is fair to say he stole the show progress as soon as possible. our that night but what else would you europe correspondent adam fleming expect from the guy behind malton. he knows how to belt out a big number. when we caught up with him reports. he seems pretty blase about his karaoke night out. here's what he had to say about it. wouldn't it be
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evenif even if the agreement will be weirder if there was a musical difficult, more and more difficult, theatre karaoke going on in wales andl theatre karaoke going on in wales and i wasn't there? i think that is but it is still possible this week. and i wasn't there? i think that is a stranger. someone on twitter looking tired after negotiations went into the night michel barnier invited me and said we will do chose every word carefully. reaching musical karaoke first night of them. it was great. i got a bunch of the an agreement... is still possible. crew and it was a fun night out for a lot of the company. he has had a obviously, any agreement must work whale of a time in wales. he has for everyone. inside he laid out the been back since because they have already started shooting series to of his dark materials in wales. timeline for ministers and the 27 tonight it is the premiere of the other countries. if there is to be a dealfor eu leaders first series. we all get to see it other countries. if there is to be a deal for eu leaders to approve at theirsummit when it lands on bbc one on sunday deal for eu leaders to approve at their summit starting on thursday, that deal would have to be agreed by the 3rd of november. a well of a tonight, tuesday, but, in brexit, time in wales. you should be working deadlines exist to be missed. for the tourist board. thank you. tonight, tuesday, but, in brexit, deadlines exist to be missedm tonight, tuesday, but, in brexit, deadlines exist to be missed. it is, of course, possible to move beyond plenty more on wales today at the summit, and to continue talks 6:30pm. same to you, peter, 6:30pm next week. that is feasible because the uk isn't due to leave the in north east lincolnshire. if you european union until the end of the month. but from everybody plus micro would like to see more on any of perspective, if we could provide those stories you can access them
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clarity at this leaders summit that via the bbc iplayer. a reminder we would be a welcome development. we have a high level of solidarity with go nationwide every weekday ireland from the beginning. and we afternoon at 4:30pm here on afternoon live. some breaking news. try to protect the integrity of the markets. if it is possible to stick to such a red line it is possible to have a deal. then we will see if it there has been a sentencing, a man has been sentenced to prison for is also possible for the british running over a police officer, pc parliament to agree on that. will there be a deal tonight? gus phillips received life changing parliament to agree on that. will there be a dealtonight? in london there be a dealtonight? in london the prime minister welcomed an observer of this process, the nato injuries after he was run over in secretary general. if he seals a deal with his other european august after a police car was collea g u es deal with his other european colleagues it'll have to be approved hijacked. more on this. our correspondent at birmingham crown by parliament, and notjust that, it'll have to be turned into british court. what has happened? the sentencing has just taken law, too, which means more votes. court. what has happened? the sentencing hasjust taken place. it was a few minutes ago. the battery assignment was jailed for 12 years parliament, once it has agreed to something, can legislate something for a number of offences including very quickly. if the vote goes through, the legislation will merely causes previously bodily harm to pc be the ratification in domestic law gus club so he ran over during the of the treaty, and that, i think is course of this operation in august a relatively easy bill to pass if this year. his accomplice was also
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there is a deal. what matters now is jailed for 28 months. now sentencing has taken place we can show you some whether the negotiating team can of the footage that was taken that work their magic in brussels. there will still be differences in customs day from helicopter, body cameras, check on the island of ireland, and and cctv. a dash cam as well. it is the shape of any future trade astonishing, itjust goes to show agreements. gaps that have to be you how lucky he was to survive. bridged injust a matter of hours or there will not be a deal this week. astonishing, itjust goes to show you how lucky he was to survivem began as a routine operation against that was adam fleming. in a moment car thieves. what happens next we will talk to our chief beggars belief. that is a brick correspondent of vicky young. first, we shall go to brussels and speak to our correspondent gavin lee. work being thrown. pc phillips arrived in their magic, what an understatement. as michel barnier is pointing out, support, both him and mubashar they need documents, they need a legal text. yes, regardless of any of the hussain were tasered. astonishingly political voices and fundamentally what is happening today, all of the leaders are what is happening today, all of the despite being hit several times, leaders a re really what is happening today, all of the leaders are really saying, in different ways, that they are watching on. angela merkel is in hussain shook off three officers and jumped into the unmarked police car. norway today saying let's see what happens in the room, as to whether there can be a deal at the summit. this shocking footage shows pc phillips being knocked to the emmanuel macron also talked about ground. what came next was shown in positivity. but ultimately i think
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it comes down to roughly 2a people, court and is too distressing for us to show here. he was left fighting for his life. mubashar hussain has 12 on either side, negotiators, technicians for the british, on the eu side, as well, three rooms inside shown no regard for the safety of police or any member of the public. here. and what they've spent 33 his actions show no respect for hours so far, since the weekend, in talks trying to work out something, humanity. hussain hit 97 mph as he almost squaring holes, trying to wove through traffic in 20 and 30 work out how to avoid a border in mph zones. he eventually stopped northern ireland with the republic. also, we expect talks will continue until, probably, midnight tonight. here and people came out of the is what i been told. regardless of shops, passers—byjoined what everybody has said, any result, here and people came out of the shops, passers—by joined in here and people came out of the shops, passers—byjoined in to try and restrain him but he still wouldn't give up. even with a gun in terms of white smoke, we will have to wait a few hours. 0k. let's talk about the white smoke. at the moment, the focus is on brussels. it pointed at him, hussain continued to could very quickly swing back here, try to escape before finally because we are all aiming for something to happen on super surrendering. amazingly despite saturday. it is a big ask at the extensive injuries, pc phillips was moment. on this side, things have gone very, able to walk into court today to see very quiet. there is not much the man who drove over him jailed.
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leaking out at all as to what's he may never fully recover. what going on here. there was definitely optimism after that meeting between alia radtke, the irish prime minister, and borisjohnson. —— leo reaction in court? the reaction was fairly muted. we are expecting a varadker. we are seeing political statement fairly soon. pc jazz leaders agreeing that movement must phillips will have one read out on be made, may be that northern ireland has to stay in both the uk his behalf by one of his colleagues. the injuries, i mentioned there, customers territory and also in the eu customs territory, but how you there was multiple fractures to his make that into a bit of legal text pelvis and hip but because he is in birmingham and they were able to is obviously the problem. that's ta ke what brussels is focused on. that is birmingham and they were able to take him to hospital where there are army doctors used to putting people michel barnier‘sjob, that's what brussels is focused on. that is michel barnier‘s job, that's what he together with battlefield injuries i is trying to really hone in on. and have been able to put him back together in such a way that he was pin the uk side down. when we spoke able to come into court on crutches to downing street earlier, they were today. he may neverfully able to come into court on crutches asked, do you recognise this today. he may never fully recover but it is hoped that within a couple deadline of midnight? they didn't of years he will certainly be able really say that, but they do say to get back to some kind of work for they are aware of the time west midlands police. as i say, we pressures , they are aware of the time pressures, they want to get will have a statement read out on something done as quickly as they his behalf in the next few minutes can. interestingly, cabinet today or so. we may well be back to you was postponed, that won't happen for that. thank you in the meantime. there until tomorrow, probably in there until tomorrow, probably in the afternoon. clearly trying to
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give as much time as possible before now all the business news. first are they briefed the cabinet, although they briefed the cabinet, although they say they are being kept headlines... the president of the up—to—date with what is going on. and then if you look toward bulgarian football union resigns after last night was '5 england match was marred by racist chants. saturday, well, jacob rees mogg, the leader of the house of commons, has just said there will be no the eu's chief negotiator michel confirmation of that sitting until barnier says there is a narrow thursday. again, going to the wire, pathway brexit deal this week but the two sides have to agree the thatis thursday. again, going to the wire, that is what downing street have details by the end of the day. and a lwa ys that is what downing street have always felt, they have said for a long time that they felt nothing would really happen until we get an increase in the number of hate right up to the deadline of this eu crimes recorded in england and summit. the problem is for saturday, wales. of course, what is the point of the house of commons sitting if there is "no deal" in place? you can see if borisjohnson was to get a deal, here's your business yes, take it to a vote, something headlines on afternoon live. for them to do. if there isn't one, royal mail postal workers have voted overwhelmingly for strike action. there does not seem much point. they it means royal mail is now run up against the act which means facing its first national postal strike in a decade. that by the 19th on saturday, boris johnson, if there hasn't been a around 110,000 members of the communication workers union deal, has to ask for a delay to were balloted in a dispute over terms and conditions brexit. but parliament doesn't have and job security. to sit in order for that to happen. 97% voted in favour a begun though there is whether he of industrial action. will in fact write that letter, get the turnout in the ballot was 76%. someone else to do it, or somehow
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circumvent that law. —— with the big thomas cook's former boss has defended a bonus payment of half a million pounds and said he was not the only one to blame thing, though, there is whether he for the collapse of the holiday operator. will in fact write that letter. it peter fankhauser said he was sorry but told a cross—party committee of mps that he worked "tirelessly" occurred to me today dot at we have for thomas cook. been conjecturing for the last three the 178—year—old travel firm went yea rs, been conjecturing for the last three years, no harm in doing it. don't stop now! under last month with the loss chuckles of 9,000 jobs and left —— we have been conjecturing for the 150 , 000 holiday—makers stranded. last three years. the date we've slamming the brakes on expensive car loans — a lwa ys the city watchdog wants to ban last three years. the date we've always seen as the 31st of october. the way that some dealers if we are in a situation where and brokers make commission somehow the eu or michel barnier or when they sell car finance schemes. the financial conduct authority someone says we have the outlines of thinks a crackdown will an agreement here. we need a few save drivers £165 million. days for the technical side of it. will there be any leeway? the it said that some dealers make problem is that the law has been commission on the loan's interest rate, which they set, passed. would there be, in the house so the higher the interest rate, of commons, the numbers to say, ok, the higher the commission. we will give you an extra week. i don't know. nobody does. the question is, does downing street have a plan up its sleeve in order a bit sneaky. now, primark. a flurry to not have to ask for that delay? something borisjohnson said very of excitement but when they put
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clearly that he wouldn't do. i'm not sure about that. the plan had been their products online but it has turned to anger. it wasn't primark made before all of this to end up that put their products online. backin made before all of this to end up back in the courts again to really demonstrate, i think from boris primark doesn't have an online shop, johnson's point of view, that he has but we know that it has established tried everything to deliver brexit. itself as a firm favourite among but i think it does change if we are shoppers who want cheap, fast fashion. on the brink of a deal because those earlier it was being reported that items from primark could soon be conservatives, particularly the 20 purchased online via amazon. who were booted out of the it was a limited selection, parliamentary side, they want a but included some of the most deal, most of them. they don't popular ranges like those featuring necessarily want another referendum, they want another deal, and they are disney, friends and harry potter. if you're a member of amazon prime, potentially willing to give boris johnson some time if they thought he you'd even get next day delivery. was genuine about getting a deal. and that generated much excitement. but then came this tweet you have used two phrases i've not heard from you, the one is, ijust don't know, and the other one is, from primark itself... simon, you are right. it won't happen again. are you 0k? simon, you are right. it won't happen again. are you ok? i will enjoy it. chuckles headlines: the bulgarian football chief has resigned after last night plus mike england match was marred by racist chance. the eu's chief that has left people somewhat angry and disappointed. what does amazon negotiator says there is a narrow path to a brexit deal this week but say? the two sides must agree the details nothing on the record,
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but of course, amazon is an online by the end of today. —— last night's marketplace and it does allow third parties to sell things on. but as is the case here, that can england match. executives of thomas cook have been asked to hand back often be at a significant mark—up, their bonuses after the company and as people discovered when they searched, some products they could get in store at primark were being sold at three or four collapsed. suggestions that bulgaria times the price if should be thrown out of the next they bought online. tournament after the racist chance in the match in sophia last night. the head of their football your car finance story, a your carfinance story, a lot your car finance story, a lot of people will say, i was not allowed in the match in sophia last night. the head of theirfootball union has resigned. good news for england to happen in the first place? it's ahead of their rugby match, billy normally quite tightly regulated. yes, if you are taking out a car vunipola is likely to be fit to start on saturday. —— in sofia. andy loa n yes, if you are taking out a car loan you might well think go to a broker or a dealer, help you find the best option. it seems some buyers in some cases were being murray is due to play his first overcharged up to £1000. that's what match in belgium later today. i will the financial watchdog found earlier this year. it unveiled its proposal be back later. see you then. to ban the setup where brokers and dealers earn commission linked to mps have called on former thomas the interest rate on the loan which cook executives to hand back their they would set themselves. not all bonuses after the travel firm of them do it that way. but in some collapsed. one former boss told a cases it would give them an cross— party collapsed. one former boss told a cross—party group of mps he wasn't the only one to blame for the incentive to charge the customer collapse. as a result, 9000 workers more. that is why there is this
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proposal to stop it. amanda strachan in the uk lost theirjobs. 140,000 holiday—makers were left stranded is the motoring editor of confused, overseas. they had to be brought and she welcomes this move. home as part of the biggest uk unquestionably it will save repatriation in peacetime. and it consumers money. our own research emerged that the tour company had shows that people are totally debts of £1.7 billion. a day of confused about what the different options mean to them. i think there is slightly murky practice of dealers being able to set their own reckoning for thomas cook's bosses. interest rate and earn greater commission will really stick in many people's throats. if we stick with a flat fee basis where people get a we understand the collapse of thomas cook caused a huge amount of stress, single commission for selling a car, disruption, and anxiety. me and my consumers will be a lot more comforted and i think it will save a collea g u es disruption, and anxiety. me and my colleagues are still devastated lot of people money and are not a about the outcome. since the lot of people money and are not a lot of people money and are not a lot of anxiety as well. has the body collapse, questions have been brimming overfrom collapse, questions have been brimming over from politicians collapse, questions have been brimming overfrom politicians and that represents car dealers and from thomas cook staff, including brokers said anything? this is the airline crew who thought they were making a profit. we were doing very, finance and leasing association, it said the crackdown will be good news for the industry and consumers, very well. and we are wondering why we we re very well. and we are wondering why we were allowed to fail, actually delivering clear rules and a consistent approach to commissions. this is just made to fail, when the rest of the consistent approach to commissions. this isjust a proposal, the evidence is a will probably publish company went. mps homed in on the
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final rules next year. the markets pay, nearly £9 million overfour yea rs, pay, nearly £9 million overfour years, including a half £1 million now. . . final rules next year. the markets now... they have been affected. we cash bonus for 2017. do you think that bonus should be paid back?|j fully that bonus should be paid back?” fully understand, i fully understand are all looking at you. nobody is ready for what you're about to do where you are coming from, and i but if you go. a lot of financial fully understand the sentiment in the public, i fully news around. the international monetary fund lowering its forecast fully understand the sentiment in the public, ifully understand, as for global growth. we have heard well, the sentiment of some of our neil woodford's troubled fund will be shut down and also an update for colleagues. however, what i can say the governor of the bank of england to that is that i worked tirelessly and an expert take on this from for the success of that company, and richard hunter head of markets at interactive investor, good to have i'm deeply sorry i wasn't able to you with us. we need some sense. the secure the deed. the chairman, who was on £300,000 a year, said the company was crippled by big debts imf downgrading its forecast for and then bad luck in the form of the global economic growth. that is a hot summer in 2018 when foreign really serious move for people here in the uk because of a knock—on holidays were less attractive. then effect that has. yes, if you look at came the heat wave, the anxiety of some of the more famous economies brexit, and the business no longer you have got germany teetering on the edge of recession at the moment,
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survived. but he was told they had we see we have our own brexit concerns and what that might mean in brought the company down and should the uk. we have had some fairly show humility. i think you are deluded about the business you ran. mixed economic data coming out of the states recently. also the you chaired a business which has previously exponential growth seeing gone under because of the decisions made collectively by your management in china is under some pressure as well. on top of all that you have team. stores are now being reopened after they were bought from the the trade spat between the us and wreckage of the business by a rival. china. i don't think the findings we re china. i don't think the findings so, why couldn't the whole group be were forecast of the imf are particularly surprising. the saved? the question is now how they are dealt with, so, why couldn't the whole group be saved ? the bosses so, why couldn't the whole group be saved? the bosses say a government rescue would have turned it into the because of course the main concern best funded travel company in in terms of the us china trade spat europe. financial advisers who went at the moment is the global through different... but fankhauser repercussions it could have on the remembered over the last six days of basis that higher tariffs historically have proved good for thomas cook he wasn't able to speak directly to a minister about his absolutely no one. big use for the request for help, only to officials. city about neil woodford's fund being shut down. he doesn't seem to think it's the best thing for at no point a government minister? investors to stop how's it going down among financial circles? me, personally, at no point in this another string to this particular story which is a new form of patient process from tuesday to sunday we
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had a minister on the phone. the capital. an investment trust also run by woodford and separately clock cannot be turned back. quoted on the stock exchange. that's travellers had to be rescued. the still going. one of the things to jobs went. but mps want lessons to look out for is what implications be learnt. how such a holiday there are in terms of that nightmare could be avoided in investment trust. that is run differently from the fund which we future. simon gompertz, bbc news. have heard today is being closed pressure is going on turkey over its down. some of the timing on this is attack on kurdish forces in northern syria. overnight the us imposed necessarily woolly. woodford has economic sanctions and this morning been moving into more liquid britain has announced that there will be no new arms sales to turkey. securities. it seems likely there will be sold quite easily and the president erdogan has insisted he will not back down from his campaign proceeds will start to be against what he describes as distributed injanuary. terrorists and wants to create a safe zone. casualties have been proceeds will start to be distributed in january. more proceeds will start to be distributed injanuary. more liquid investments may take long to sell so mounting, around 160,000 people have there is no timescale on that. it been forced from their homes. our correspondent reports... seems rather likely that the week two of the turkish invasion, majority of investors are going to and there is no let up. intense end up very much on the losing side. battles this morning in the syrian border town. turkish troops have we heard the governor of the bank of england giving evidence to mp5. he pounded targets, but kurdish forces has said there could be short moves have fought back. turkey and the in markets and currencies, sharp
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syrian fighters it supports have movements and the cost of debt for taken over 60 miles from the kurds businesses in the uk depending on they call terrorists. they have made how the brexit or scope. but he said a rapid advance, taking down kurdish the uk is quite well placed to control in key areas. the kurds have withstand that. is that the same sort of sentiment among people that now called in help from the assad you speak to? certainly in terms of regime, giving his forces free rein into towns they lost seven years banks, since the financial crisis banks, since the financial crisis banks globally have been cleaning up ago. it is compromise or genocide, theiract, banks globally have been cleaning up their act, they have a lot more said one kurdish commander. and a capital put to one side. they are much more financially robust. i think it's fair to say that the uk pull back has allowed some islamic banks will go into the brexit state fighters the kurds were guarding to break free. state fighters the kurds were guarding to breakfree. this has outcome from a position of strength. said to be —— this is said to be an that being said, on a more empty prison were somewhere being held, the kurds have worries now. day—to—day basis we have a very good day—to—day basis we have a very good day on friday for example, it seemed turkey is drawing international as though some sort of breakthrough condemnation. britain halting new had been made. the kind of selected arms export licences to the capital, that has been in the firing line and the us has slapped sanctions on during the brexit negotiations in turkish ministers and tariffs on its the uk is the house—building sector, as they had a particularly good day steel. the vice president denied that donald trump's decision to on friday, and of course we see the withdraw troops from syria gave turkey a green light to move in. at daily machinations and vacillations the presents direction, the us has from what's happening to stirling, that will not stop anytime soon. at imposed punishing sanctions on
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turkey, and made it very clear that least if there is a line drawn in the sand with the brexit deadline, there will only be the beginning, people will be able to once and for u nless there will only be the beginning, unless turkey is willing to embrace all see what we are actually up against economically. thank you. a ceasefire, come to the negotiating table, and end the violence. meanwhile, kurdish fighters and that's all the business for the civilians are dying, dozens killed softening. thank you. breaking news in the past week. more than 10,000 following the racist chanting last kurds have died fighting is. this, night. uefa have charged bulgaria they say, is how the west repays and england for the fans‘ behaviour them. the humanitarian crisis is during last night was my qualifier. building. 160,000 displaced in the the charges against a bulgarian football union alleged racist last few days. turkey's leader is behaviour, the throwing of objects, pushing on, vowing to secure the disruption of the national anthem, region. but for old and young, in and disruption of replacing a giant place of security there is fresh screen. the charges against english blood shed, fresh foes, and a football association, disruption of deepening of a syria's nightmare. the national anthem, and insufficient number of travelling stewards. breach of article 24, of mark lohan, bbc news. let's take a look at the weather. you have got the safety relations. that coming some wind! chuckles idea! how long did it take you to in. plenty more in the news at five. figure that out! that is for ben brown. now let's have a look at the weather with darren bett. still one or two its powerful, isn't it? this is a
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picture from the south of france. showers around but most places will a tornado hit the area. houses were be dry. not sunny everywhere. still quite a lot of cloud across parts of damaged, five people were injured. north wales. the north midlands i'm going to show you the sort of heading up into northern ireland. one or two showers for south wales and southern england. maybe one or weather on the radar picture and the two showers and southern england. maybe one or lightning flashes. you can see how two 5 howe rs a cross and southern england. maybe one or two showers across the far close it got to the south—east of north—east of scotland. temperature is about 14—16. also some rain england. coming in from the atlantic. any is that why you were warning me showers will find a way ahead of that. patchy rain coming in from the yesterday? yes, because we like you! west. the latest weather probably chuckles just up the road there, 50 where the hills of western scotland and that was the south coast of england where the winds will pick up millimetres, two inches of rain fell in the space of 30 minutes, which is a bit. i had a little chilly across why we've got pictures of flooded eastern scotland and north—east streets we cannot show you because a england. that band of cloud and body else has got them. but we have quite patchy rain will continue this one. this isn't france, this is northwards and eastwards tomorrow. clearing out reasoning and by the end of the morning into the nottinghamshire. we have flooding afternoon. lingering in the here. still a number of flood warnings out at the moment. it has north—east of scotland. rain threatens to come back to south—east, but many pieces dry and been very wet, hasn't it? even you quite sunny in the afternoon. one or two showers into the temperatures must have realised that standing out again near normalfor the in penzance. even though you were two showers into the temperatures again near normal for the time of dry in london yesterday, lucky
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thing. you told me at four o'clock i was going to get absolutely drenched. yes, but he finished at five, you year. are ok. you were one hour out. i was wrong. sorry? something else you don't normally the headlines at 5pm. hear... i was wrong. it happens. the president of the bulgarian football union resigns, after last night's match like vicky says, though, it won't with england was marred by racism. happen again. i'm not so confident about that. the euro 2020 qualifier in the capital sofia was halted these are the number of days of twice, with black england players consecutive rainfall. it has been the target of racist abuse. we've made a huge statement and, that worked for so long. that was up until today, because a lot of places frankly, we were in an impossible today are having a dry day. we have situation. uefa, who i've spoken to throughout some time, as well. belfast has been the game at half—time and at the end 23 days with rain. it may well be of the game, will be carrying out a dry today, few showers in northern thorough investigation. ireland, and the sun is out. but it has not been a dry day in camborne, we'll be speaking to the former because we have had a few showers professional footballer fabrice muamba, who also experienced this morning. they have probably racist chanting in bulgaria. also coming up... looked worse than they were. the eu says they must agree that is easy for you to say! details of a brexit deal
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i wasn't there! exactly! i was on the train, eventually. lincolnshire was one of the wettest areas, which is why we have all of these muggy fields, and it is too muqqy “ these muggy fields, and it is too muggy —— that is why we have all of these muddy fields, and it was too muddy to get the tractors out. this cloud gave us a near miss. some showers for north—eastern scotland come into wales, south wales, and southern england, but elsewhere it's dry. afair southern england, but elsewhere it's dry. a fair bit of cloud over the north midlands and parts of lincolnshire. here it is on the chilly side. the showers we have all tend to fade away this evening but only because the breeze will pick up and we have this band of rain coming in from the atlantic. it is patchy rain, the heaviest probably over the hills of west scotland later, and
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along the south coast of england where the winds will be strongest. ahead of that, with clear skies for a while, chilly across eastern scotla nd a while, chilly across eastern scotland and the north—east of england. tomorrow we have this rather patchy rain, which will continue northwards and eastwards, clearing away from eastern england steadily through the morning. although there is a threat of it coming back into the south—east corner. sunshine following into many parts of the country. this is clean air, so more sunshine than today. just some showers out towards the south—west. temperatures near normal for this time of the year. clearing the the front, the main driver of the the front, the main driver of the weather is that area of low pressure. that is just going to wonder towards the uk. it is taking a liking to our shores and will sit with us for a few days and bring some rain. showers and rain developing for the western side of the uk on thursday. the wind is picking up as well. dry along the eastern scotland and eastern england. those temperatures still 13 to 15 degrees. towards the end of the week, dominated by that big area
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of low pressure, there will be some more rain, which could be quite heavy, as well. gusty winds near those showers. some china times. turning chilly at night. and particularly as we head into the weekend, because the number of showers it produces, more places will become dry, but there will be a northerly breeze. —— some showers at times. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: the president of the bulgarian football union resigns after last night's england match was
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marred by racist chants. we could be criticised for not going far enough but i think we have made a huge statement and frankly, we we re a huge statement and frankly, we were in an impossible situation to get it right to the satisfaction of everyone. the eu's heath negotiator says that there is a narrow path to a brexit deal this week but the two sides have to by the end of today, he says. reaching an agreement is still possible. obviously, any agreement must work for everyone. mps: former thomas cook bosses to do the right thing and hand back their bonuses after the travel firm collapsed with debts of £1.7 billion. ican billion. i can fully understand that is why we are here, that the millions of customers, the 22,000 colleagues and as well, the uk taxpayer has a lot of questions.
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climate change protests continue in london despite police telling extinction rebellion to end their action orface arrest. extinction rebellion to end their action or face arrest. we go to will parry who has got this board. we are talking about what had happened off the pitch. what has been done to stop those disgraceful scenes happening again? summon the football family and the government need to wage war on the basis. there is with the words of the uefa president today who says after the abuse of those players in bulgaria england's euro 2020 qualifier, halted due to racist abuse. football associations cannot solve the issues alone. the behaviour of fans which included nazichance behaviour of fans which included nazi chance has been widely condemned by players and politicians. in a statement in the last couple of hours later said it is committed to doing anything it can to eliminate this disease from football and in the last 50 minutes
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orso, as football and in the last 50 minutes or so, as you mention, head of the bulgarian football union has resigned following pressure from the prime minister to do so. the network setup to counter discrimination believes that bulgaria should be expeued believes that bulgaria should be expelled from the euro 2020 qualifying campaign. we think that after what happened it is in their power to keep bulgaria out of euro 2020 qualification for sure. they have been too many incidents. they have been too much from the bulgarian fa and they should be made an example of an expeued should be made an example of an expelled from the competition. issues of racism was barely acknowledged in the bulgarian national newspapers. it shows just how bad the few full team was. the last 6—0 and the minister urging the head of the bulgarian football union to go notjust because of the racism but because of the result. there is talk about the rugby world
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cup because it appear the mind games are under way. head of the quarterfinals, what a term of this could turn out to be. along with japan, wales are one of only two sides in the competition who have won all four of their matches whereas fans were among the teams to have had a game cancelled because of the typhoon. some teams have had the extra rest and others ahead of those quarterfinals because their games were postponed but one of them, the french, they are playing wales on sunday so was it good forfans playing wales on sunday so was it good for fans that they rested better for the welsh to keep on playing? there are game cancelled so they had an extra couple of days rest may be and to prepare for our game on sunday but we are happy that we played our game against uruguay and there were a lot opportunities. a few boys at the game off to recover and fully prepare for the quarterfinals. we feel like, as a squad, we are in a good place. good news for england ahead of their game against australia on saturday. there are number eight is now very likely fit to start, according to the england
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defence coach. he injured his ankle against argentina ten days ago but he is coming close to a return for england. they had beaten the wallabies in the last six meetings but england have not won a world cup knockout match for 12 years. but in's was heptathlon champion in has been nominated for the world athlete of the year award. she won her first athlete of the year award. she won herfirst global outdoor athlete of the year award. she won her first global outdoor title at the world championships with a british record. she also won the european indoor title back in march. the jamaican athlete stomped to world gold. one must try to bring you. andy murray is due in court in the first round of the european open in antwerp later but he may have leave the tournament early because it's that child is due this month and he will return to london if his wife goes into labour. he said he will ta ke goes into labour. he said he will take a month off and the baby does arrive. he scheduled to play the
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local favourite at around 6:30pm. that is the spot for now. see you later. thank you. extinction rebellion activists are continuing their protest despite a london wide ban by police. the group says it will challenge the decision, saying it believes it is unlawful. one of the group's co—founders was arrested after climbing on top of the entrance to the department for transport and trying to smash a glass panel with a hammer. you called on the government to stop funding projects such as high—speed rail route, hs two, and airport expansion. protesters are now camping up to the site at transfer back to trafalgar square was clear last night. the protest which began last night. the protest which began last seen more than 1400 arrests. a government spokeswoman said it should not disrupt peoples day—to—day lives. joining me now is the green party mep who was arrested during the clear vet operation in square last night. how are you feeling about that today? hello. well, iwent along
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how are you feeling about that today? hello. well, i went along to trafalgar square last night when i heard that the police were banning all public protests throughout the city because i wanted to ask what the justification was. there was no disturbance in trafalgar square that would justify such a disproportionate decision. except that the police had already said that large groups of people gathering together after this period of time, they want to stop it. yes. they had used section 14 of the public order act to issue a blanket injunction, a blanket ban on all peaceful public protest anywhere in the city. now, in my view... just to stop you, thatis now, in my view... just to stop you, that is not what they're saying. they say everyone has the right to protest but does not necessarily have the right to protest for days on end and bring the disruption disruption that that brings with it. well, the issue that this extension of the order with only half an
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hour's notice. they have a name for a long time, as has everybody that extinction rebellion were planning a two week protest. in my view, the ability to protest peacefully, publicly as a cornerstone of our democracy and i went to trafalgar square in order to what was the justification for such a disproportionate measure. they arrested me for standing in trafalgar square and asking them for an explanation. some people had glued themselves to the ground and some people have been there since monday. at what point does a protest become a nuisance? ithink at what point does a protest become a nuisance? i think of because there has been some disruption caused by the extinction rebellion protests and of course that is what they intended to do because they want to bring the climate crisis to public attention and actually, it has been quite interesting to see the way that, back in the spring and again now people protesting out on the streets is ringing public attention to the climate crisis. the skill strike us as well done an amazing
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job of bringing this crisis home and we've seen with the different types of people arrested over the last ten days, grandmothers, grandads, rabbis, former paralympic athletes, we have seen that this is a protest around which people of all unite because they are desperately concerned about the climate emergency. whilst the argument that the public become more aware and indeed may support protest like that, isn't there a danger that actually, you alienate the very people you are trying to persuade? well, theoretically, perhaps. but in reality what we have seen is that public support for stronger action on climate change is growing. there was another... that is a wider issue. i believe talking specifically about those in the cities that have been directly affected. many of whom have been often severely disrupted by the actions of extinction rebellion. over a week in london, said last monday this has been going on and many of them, i suspect, not support
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you whilst they support the wider issue. ican issue. i can see that, for individuals who have experienced disruption, it is going to be frustrating, of course. and i'm sure everybody regret that. but as extinction rebellion themselves have said there will be much greater disruption if we don't tackle the climate crisis and i think the point i'm trying to make is despite that disruption, public opinion is moving with the protesters, public opinion acknowledges the urgency of the climate crisis and the need for stronger government action under the same time public opinion, i'm sure, will be totally behind the argument that the right to peaceful public protest is a cornerstone of our democracy. and shouldn't just be democracy. and shouldn'tjust be blanket band. if you get a criminal record as a result of this what will that mean to you? i don't think it will get a criminal record that i have been released under investigation which means, i think, released under investigation which means, ithink, they're released under investigation which means, i think, they're going to look into it a little bit longer. you can still be charged? i have not been charged with
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anything, no. icould. but all there we re anything, no. icould. but all there were still standing in trafalgar square police the justification for an extreme ban on all public protest which, in my view, goes completely counter to the values of our democracy. thank you so much for your time this afternoon. meanwhile the government is publishing what it was a landmark bill to tackle urgent environmental problems. it aims to improve air and water quality, tackle plastic pollution, restore wildlife and protect the climate. labour says the bill is irrelevant because the government would be able to deliver it. our environmental analyst has more. across britain children are being harmed by particles from exhausts, tyres and brakes. today, the government promises legally binding targets to curb that particle pollution. the treasury was previously blocking that. but there are no details yet in this multipurpose bill. it will set a
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framework for legally binding targets on issues such as protection of nature and biodiversity, and air quality, and water, to help us set a plan to meet demanding environmental goals. the plans for nature recovery networks the woods, fields and rivers have been welcomed. waterways will be protected, too. and after brexit, the government will be held to account by new watchdog, the office of environmental protection. ministers say it will have strong powers but it won't be able to find the government like the eu can. environmentalists say that is a mistake. something that needs to be pa rt mistake. something that needs to be part of this toolkit if you like is the power to issue fines, which is absent at the moment. and we never mow experience across europe that this is one of the most powerful and effective remedies that the european tab to actually ensure that the law is upheld. and what about the global income to the main impact of how the uk lives? the amazon is being cleared in part to produce the beef that is eaten in
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britain. today's announcement is a huge step forward but equally, while we are putting strong legislation in place here at home we need to take into account our footprint around the world. we employed untold levels of commodities and cannot do is to shift the environmental blame elsewhere. meanwhile, the government is still pursuing goals that increase pollution like expanding heathrow, building more roads and subsidising oil exploration. and fracking. campaigners won't stop until the pollution stops. the number of hate crimes reported to police in england and wales has reached a record high. figures from the home of a show there has been a 10% rise from the previous year. more than three quarters of the offences were related to racism. the corded transgender hate related to racism. the corded tra nsgender hate crime related to racism. the corded transgender hate crime increased by more one third from the year before. our home affairs correspondent reports. there's been a rise in all types of
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hate crimes reported to police but it is racially motivated offences that make up the majority of them. atan that make up the majority of them. at an east london mosque sofia supports muslim women who have been subjected to religious hate crimes. she has been targeted, too. my tattered experiences of being kicked by doc marten boots. racial abuse. i go back home. you know, i have been brought up here. this is mayhem. figures show there we re this is mayhem. figures show there were more than 100,000 hate crime offences recorded by police in england and wales in 2018—2019. that isa england and wales in 2018—2019. that is a record number a 10% rise on last year. race hate crimes accounted for around three quarters of all offences. more than 78,000 cases. the need to be some difficult conversations around the sort of role of subtle forms of racism or subtle forms of islamophobia are other forms of
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discrimination in british culture thatis discrimination in british culture that is what we is that as forms of hate rise when they do become embedded in the culture. transgender hate embedded in the culture. tra nsgender hate crime embedded in the culture. transgender hate crime has risen by 37%. josie told me since he she transition ten years ago she has been verbally and physically abused on the tube and in the street more than 150 times. some things cut quite deep. being a patient saying, you should have been strangled at birth. people like you don't deserve to live. and they will go away and i'm left standing there, going,. the home office as this ongoing rise is partly due to better reporting of according by police forces but there was a spike in incidences after the terror attacks in 2017 and the eu referendum. figures show that few of these cases are being solved. police forces are under growing pressure to do more to catch those responsible.
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ina memo catch those responsible. in a memo ban has all the business news. that is coming up in a couple of seconds but first the advance. the president of the bulgarian football union resigns after last night's england match was marred by racist chants that have eu's chief negotiator says there is a narrow passive exit deal this week but the two sides had to agree the details by the end of the day. mps have called on former thomas cook to hand back their bonuses after the travel firm collapsed. here are your business headlines here an afternoon light. as we were just hearing thomas cook bosses defended the bonus payment of have £1 million and said he was not the only one to blame for the collapse of the holiday operator. he said he was sorry but tell the cross—party committee of mps that he worked tirelessly for thomas cook. the travel firm at under last month with
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the loss of 9000 jobs and leaving 150,000 the loss of 9000 jobs and leaving 150 , 000 holiday—makers stranded. slamming the brakes on expensive car loa ns. slamming the brakes on expensive car loans. the city watchdog wants to ban the way that some dealers and brokers may commission when they sell car finance schemes. the financial conduct authority thinks a crackdown will save drivers £165 million. they said some dealers may commission on the loans interest rate which they said. the higher the interest rate, the higher the commission. there is a rise in the number of people unemployed in the uk between june and number of people unemployed in the uk betweenjune and august. which was unexpected, unemployment went up to 3.9% but average wages are still going up faster than average prices. earnings, excluding bonuses, with an annual pace of 3.8%. i don't know what your bedside reading is but at the moment i would not recommend the international monetary fund report because it is a bit gloomy. yes, enough to give you nightmares. it has lowered its expectations and said expects the world economy will grow this year at the slowest pace
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since the global financial crisis of 2008, 2009 stops of it is now predicting that the economy around the web will grow 3% this year rather than the earlier forecast of 3.2%. if this were a weather forecast, the imf is basically saying it is becoming much more overcast and it could darken considerably if the trade tensions don't get sorted out. we are not in the eye of the storm just yet but clouds are certainly gathering and this matters to the uk. because of the world economy slows down that means people are spending less, businesses make less money. they then invest icelandic administrative jobs. and wages. so why their forecast? the imf has developed the identified a slowdown in manufacturing and trade. what is behind that? let's get more from our north america business reporter who is not at the new york stock
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exchange but in washington, dc. what has the imf pinpointed, then? one of the big things that the imf has been pointing to is, of course, the trade war that is ongoing between the united states and china. it has been going on for more than 15 months and it is certainly having a significant impact on global growth. as you rightly pointed out we are seeing a really big slowdown in manufacturing. and that is really having a ripple effect so we saw some plunging numbers in china and we are seeing that really having an impact on other manufacturing sectors bite around the globe so really this trade war has had a really this trade war has had a really big impact and that is a big reason why you are seeing that they have lowered their global growth outlook for the coming year. they mentioned the us china trade war. what about brexit my did not feature at all in their reasoning? absolutely committed. there was a lot of talk about brexit and the kind of impact that is going to have on europe. the big worry about
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brexit is what is going to happen to business investment. and all of that uncertainty means that people aren't going to be investing as much and that again will have really big and impact throughout europe. so another sort of thing that is really making the imf nervous about how well the global economy is going to go is all of the uncertainty surrounding brexit and what kind an impact that is going to have, specifically in europe. did the imf give any indication about what countries can do about it, perhaps? one of the things that the imf pointed to in terms of what countries can do about it is actually centred on the central banks. central banks are the ones that are in charge of monetary policy so one of the big ways that we see that as interest rates. so we have seen and did my countries around the world that have been lowering the interest rate so that is really good. but the imf has re—cautioned that, saying that look, the fact that they are lowering interest rates good right now but if
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the global economy gets any worse, then, they are not going to have any other room to manoeuvre so that is one concern. and of course, the other concern is what monetary policy can only go so far. you really need to have a coherent policy and when it comes to that there is a lot of concern about some countries around the world and the economic policy that is pushed by particular governments and that might not actually be helping the global economy. thank you very much indeed. now, up, up thank you very much indeed. now, up, up and away. but a rather long way. there is a rather interesting fight happening this week, isn't there? i see what you have done there. well, you should, you wrote it. i only take credit for the good things i write. not the terrible ones. this is the world's longest nonstop flight. they are testing it out. it will fly from new york to syd ney out. it will fly from new york to sydney nonstop. it is 20 hours and that length of flight direct has never been done before.
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so what is the longest you have ever flown ? i think it was 16 hours. a flight to australia. same. i'm glad we were not on the same site was up 16 hours next to you, i don't think i could cope. what about the health issues this raises, then? that is why they are doing the test flight. it that is why they are doing the test flight. it is basically... you would rather get it out the way that have to stop. some people say the stopping of lets you stretch your legs. we don't know what the effects on human body would be so that ending this test flight into a be so that ending this test flight intoa midair be so that ending this test flight into a midair laboratory with. they will have signs and researchers on board. they will be monitoring the alertness of the pilots in the brain activity. they will be monitoring the passengers. there are a few dozen passengers on this test flight and they will monitor their food, their sleep, their activity, so these people will be the guinea pigs before the rest of us are given the
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chance to spend so long at high altitude. with a b cameras and all the aisles and things check on what people are up and things check on what people are ? i'm not sure how much of it is cameras and some is why it up to check on pulse, you know, their metabolism and that sort of thing. 16 hours is a long time. but 20 hours... even longer. superb maths. they take off from new york on the friday and the land in sydney on the friday and the land in sydney on the friday and the land in sydney on the sunday which i think is a bit ofa on the sunday which i think is a bit of a raw deal. they lose their weekend completely. not fair. shall we have a look at the markets. let's. they are coming. they are worth waiting for. ftse 100 just a touch lower. this is after sterling rose against the dollar and the euro. this is after this light, you
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know, resumption of talks and optimism around the talks between britain and the eu about a possible brexit deal. stronger pound weighs in the ftse because of the big multinational firms listed were to buy will have more business a little later in the afternoon. thank you. i'll tell you but the duke and duchess of cambridge but they have met pakistan's prime minister. the former cricketer a friend of diana, princess of wales and new prince william as a child. this report does contain flash photography. education climate change are understood to be the issue is the duke and duchess want to focus on. they met the country's prime minister. the cricketer turned politician. for both countries, this is a key international relationship. in pakistan, this royal visit is being seen as an opportunity to highlight
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how much security has improved in recent yea rs. how much security has improved in recent years. the authorities here are keen on attracting more foreign investment and more foreign tourists. british officials say best triple focus on showing pakistan as a forward—looking country and that is something many ordinary people here welcome. it isa here welcome. it is a great message to the world outside to tell us how pakistan is a new country, we are up and blooming and we are not what they portray us to be. the timing is really good. pakistan needs to improve its soft image. and we welcome them. princess diana's visit attracted media attention. the top will have an adverse emotional significance for prince william as he traces some of his late mother's footsteps. she made three visits during the 19905 and are still warmly remembered. a leading politician a55igned and are still warmly remembered. a leading politician assigned to look after diana in herfirst
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a leading politician assigned to look after diana in her first visit. a magic 5urrounded her. she was like afairy a magic 5urrounded her. she was like a fairy tale prince55 a magic 5urrounded her. she was like a fairy tale princess and women, especially, came out to see this fairy tale prince55. later this week, the royal couple will be travelling to the city of lahore and to the mountainous north of pakistan will stop security preparations have been intense but the couple say they want to see as much of the country as possible. headlines coming up are now look at the weather with the one and only darren. just as well. thank you very much indeed. good afternoon. some dry weather today acro55 much indeed. good afternoon. some dry weather today across many parts of the country and that is much needed, of course, given how wet it has been recently. to give you an idea of how wet it has been this as a child, really, of the number of consecutive days events over 23 days ina row consecutive days events over 23 days in a row that has reined injersey and in cornwall a5 in a row that has reined injersey and in cornwall as well. there is
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more rain coming in from the atla ntic more rain coming in from the atlantic from that area of cloud tonight. that was the cloud that brought the rain yesterday and at first this morning. that is tending to push away now. we've got the 5un5hine out in some parts of the country. a much better day in belfast. weight in parts of the midlands. this is really the result of the rain in the past few days. we may weigh found the river level starting to drop a little bit. in addition acro55 part5 starting to drop a little bit. in addition acro55 parts of wales, southern england and the parts of scotla nd southern england and the parts of scotland as well stop clouding to pa rt5 of scotland as well stop clouding to parts of northern england so temperatures are a bit lower here. the shower is that we do have or tend to fade away, actually. that is because the breeze will pick up a bit and we will see this band of rain coming in from the atlantic. the heaviest rain later in the night over the hills of western scotland and driving in the south coast of england where it could be quite blu5tery tonight as well put a there of that, with clearer skies, eastern scotla nd of that, with clearer skies, eastern scotland and north east england could be a bit of chili. six or 7 degrees. tomorrow that band of cloud
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and rain pu5hed northward and eastward i5 and rain pu5hed northward and eastward is becoming lighter and more patchy put up should clear away from eastern england by the morning and could return to the south—east corner later on most areas the sun i5 corner later on most areas the sun is going to be out and there will be one or two showers. this place is dry. there is temperature still 12-16d. dry. there is temperature still 12—16d. now, while we see the back that when a band we have got the main driving force heading back into the uk. that habit of low pressure. and that will start to bring rain backin and that will start to bring rain back in again from the west on thursday. now, for the western side of the uk the winds were stronger. it will have some gales, perhaps, here and there. gusty winds near those heavy showers are longer spells of rain. eastern areas drier for longer but even here showers arriving later on in the afternoon. not changing a great feel. 13—15. as we head towards the end of the week we've got the showers or longer spells of rain which can be heavy or possibly thundery. there will be sunshine at times but quite gusty winds near those heavy showers. it will be turning bit cooler even as we head into the weekend. a
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northerly breeze and hopefully more places will be dry as the showers become fewer. the president of the bulgarian football union resigned after last night's match was marred by racist chance. michel barnier says there is a narrow path to a better deal this week. the two sides must agree the details by the end of today. reaching an agreement... is still possible. obviously, any agreement must work for everyone. mps school and former thomas cook boss is to do the right thing and hand back their bonuses after the travel firm collapsed with debts of £1.7 billion. i can fully understand, and thatis billion. i can fully understand, and that is why we are here, that
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millions of customers, 22,000 colleague, and as for the uk taxpayers, have a lot of questions. and, coming up, all of the sport with will perry, will? more fallout from last night's game in sofia, bulgaria. the family of football governance need to wage a war on racism, according to the president of uefa. and we will have the latest on the rugby world cup in japan. darren is looking at the weather for us, darren? many places dry today, a little bit of sunshine, more rain in the forecast, and later on in the programme we will look at how wet it has been here in the uk and all of the storms which we have had recently across the channel in france. see you later on, darren, thanks. also coming up: the duke and duchess of cambridge meet imran khan during their five—day visit to the country. —— back to the country of pakistan.
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once again, a football match is dominated by not what happened on the pitch but off it. the disgraceful scenes in sofia, bulgaria last night have sparked international condemnation. in the last hour the president of bulgaria's football union has resigned. england players were consistently racially abused in the european qualifier which ended 6—0 to england. but it had to be halted twice because of racial abuse. we have been here before and racism is and confined to international matches. some football pundits have said if it happens again the players should be taken off the pitch. joe wilson reports. you could say this game began with marcus rashford's blistering finish to score the first england goal. in fact, it began before that. it began when england's players first heard the monkey chants, the racial abuse. whistling.
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i mean, i heard it before i even got to the other side of the pitch in the warm—up. we spoke about it, coming off the pitch, after the warm—up and then, obviously, it was happening in the game but, like i said, it's difficult to categorise the whole country. i think it's perhaps a minority and the second half was a lot better, so perhaps a victory all round. uefa, who i've spoken to throughout the game, at half—time and at the end of the game, will be carrying out a thorough investigation — not just what the ref saw and what the officials around him saw, but also live footage, witness statements to make sure that this appalling scene of terrible racism is treated appropriately. there were intense discussions between england players, management and officials through the first half and an announcement was made to the crowd that the referee might suspend the game if the abuse continued. it was greeted by boos.
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there were nazi salutes in the ground. when england's players left this pitch at half—time, they then actually discussed whether they should even carry on with the match. they decided to play on and england's captain told me he believes that was the right decision. everyone wanted to carry on and do their talking on the pitch, which i'm extremely proud of. it's not easy to play in circumstances like that, but the 6—0 victory and the way we played, the manner in which we played, i'm extremely proud of, for sure. england's manager felt they had handled the situation in the best way. i'm incredibly proud of all of the players and all of the staff. i don't think... of course, we could be criticised for not going far enough, but i think we've made a huge statement and, frankly, we were in an impossible situation to get it right to the satisfaction of everybody. but bulgaria's manager gave a different perspective. translation: i was totally concentrated on the game. i didn't actually hear anything,
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but i've just talked to the english press officers and i told them that if this is proven to be true, then we will have to be ashamed and apologise for it. but, once again, firstly, it has to be proven to be true. one answer to the abuse was the scoreline. commentator: up towards kane. manager gareth southgate has openly acknowledged that english football has its own issues to deal with, but racism was displayed in its starkest, most blatant form in bulgaria. england's players exposed it, but the reaction can't stop here. it is worth remembering that the bulgarian football authorities were angry when england even brought up the issue of racism in the build—up to this game. we heard bulgaria's manager tell us there was not an issue in this country with racism. clearly, racism stretches way beyond bulgaria, but nothing was ever changed in a spirit of denial. joe wilson, bbc news, in sofia.
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the referee for the match was following uefa's 3—step racism protocol. the first incident occurred on the 28th minute when england were leading 2—0. the stadion announcement was made condemning the abuse and warned fans that if further instances occurred the match might be abandoned. the game was stopped again just before half—time while there were discussions between the england manager gareth southgate and match officials. the fans who are making racist chance and gestures left the stadium. the game would have been abandoned if a third incident had occurred. alexander safran has defended european football's governing bodies of their decision. they say that their sanctions are among the toughest in sport. the statement goes on to say... more reaction to this. bobby barnes as chief executive of the professional footballers association
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and is in our central london studios. here we go again, we have talked about this before, and it is not being dealt with, it seems. good afternoon, you are right, i cannot help but feel a sense of deja vu as idomy help but feel a sense of deja vu as i do my various media calls throughout the day. the one thing i would say, as a way of hope, is the fa ct would say, as a way of hope, is the fact that in terms of the protocol it was the first time that i'm aware the 3—step protocol has actually been implemented in such a high—profile game today. and i'm pleased that although we got through to the stopping of the game and to making the announcement, i am a little bit disappointed. i see it as an opportunity missed, in the sense that i think that the strongest message that would have been sent out to those who come to grounds spewing this filth, would have been for the game to have actually been stopped, and possibly abandoned. the trouble with that is you have fans who have travelled from wherever, in this case it was england, and many
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people who did nothing wrong last night, and those are the ones you are hurting. i agree and the big problem is that. it's a very, very small minority. at this point i would like to say that i have a great deal of sympathy for the people of bulgaria. i have visited the city of sofia many times and i've always had a warm welcome there. let me pick you up on that. bulgarians were getting upset that this was even being raised as an issue before the match. it hasn't been on the papers in bulgaria today which suggests they are not taking it as seriously as we are. as you said at the top of the show, there is an element of denial in there, in the sense that i don't think anybody who either was in the stadium or has seen the footage on tv can deny what took place. there is an element there of perhaps people trying to play things down for whatever reason. we have all made it clear
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that we have seen what we have seen. the bulgarian government have said they have seen what they have seen. where we are now is that, i think we've got to move on and say, ok, fine, we then prevented the protocol, but what we need to make sure is what comes next, how do we underpin this protocol? because it is one thing managing the match day experience, so to speak, but now we must look at it and say, ok, that is what happened last night, what happens subsequent to last night? what sanctions are there to be in place? let's not forget that the game took place in a stadium which was already subject to a partial stadium closure, and there had already been financial penalties. clearly those sanction measures haven't worked. we must now look at, 0k, haven't worked. we must now look at, ok, stadium closures don't work, neither do financial measures, perhaps we need to be a bit more stringent now and perhaps consider whether or not it will be points deductions, or whether it be expulsion from competitions. now, that'll hurt all of the good people who genuinely want to watch a game,
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and, of course, it'll hurt the players. but ultimately, we are getting to a situation where this insidious racism is creeping into the game on a daily basis, and i think if we are not careful, and if we don't put a strong lid on it now, then we are going to be getting to a situation where we were certainly backin situation where we were certainly back in the day. i remember when i first started in the 19805, when you had the far right openly handing out leaflets outside football grounds, and bananas, and chanting taking place in the ground. we have got to ta ke place in the ground. we have got to take measures to stamp this out. now, this could potentially be a seminal moment in football history when we have seen the protocol in action. it is inevitable that at some stage we will see the protocol carried on to its conclusion whereby a game will be abandoned, and it is at that stage, i think, when the authorities will need to step in and say, right, ok, that's the match day, now let's see how we are going
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to deal with the sanctions for the country concerned after that. two things struck me last night. the score, 6—0, which says its own thing. the other thing was the dignity of the players who were the target of this last night. absolutely. we have a generation, i think, of football players now who have grown up in a different environment. whilst they are not going to turn the other cheek, i think there was a real sense of leadership last night, not only from gareth, but also from greg clark of the fa. you could see the players had been prepared. he had experienced people like chris powell on the bench, as well, who were able to, if you like, mentor the players. i think that showed a great deal of unity and dignity, as you said, and i think made sure that the whole experience and those involved got, it is difficult to say the best out
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of it, but certainly made the best of it, but certainly made the best of what was a bad situation. thank you for talking to us. thank you for your time. the european union's chief brexit negotiator says i deal needs to be agreed with the uk by midnight tonight if it is to be signed off at the summit of eu leaders on thursday. michel barnier said a deal would be difficult to achieve but is still possible as long as the legal text is agreed today. it comes after the uk put forward new proposals for customs arrangements. downing street says boris johnson customs arrangements. downing street says borisjohnson is aware of the time constraint and wants to make progress as soon as possible. adam fleming reports... what felt like all of europe was waiting to hear, if the brexit talks we re waiting to hear, if the brexit talks were making progress. even if the agreement will be difficult, more and more difficult, we think it is still possible this week. looking tired after negotiations went into the night michel barnier chose every word carefully. reaching an agreement...
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..is still possible. obviously, any agreement must work for everyone. inside he laid out the timeline for ministers and the 27 other countries. if there is to be a deal for eu leaders to approve at their summit starting on thursday, that deal would have to be agreed by tonight, tuesday, but, in brexit, deadlines exist to be missed. it is, of course, possible to move beyond the summit, and to continue talks next week. that is feasible because the uk isn't due to leave the european union until the end of the month. but from everybody‘s perspective, if we could provide clarity at this leaders summit that would be a welcome development. we have a high level of solidarity with ireland from the beginning. and we try to protect the integrity of the markets. if it is possible to stick to such a red line it is possible to have a deal.
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then we will see if it is also possible for the british parliament to agree on that. will there be a deal tonight? in london, the prime minister welcomed an observer of this process, the nato secretary general. if the pm seals the deal with his other european colleagues it'll have to be approved by parliament, and notjust that, it'll have to be turned into british law, too, which means more votes. parliament, once it has agreed something, can legislate something very quickly. if the meaningful vote goes through, the legislation will merely be the ratification in domestic law of the treaty, and that, i think, is a relatively easy bill to pass if there is a deal. what matters now is whether the negotiating team can work their magic in brussels. there will still be differences, like the customs check on the island of ireland, and the shape of any
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future trade agreements. gaps that have to be bridged injust a matter of hours or there will not be a deal this week. this is micky young. i don't know what the french for it is, but tick—tock is the message. what the french for it is, but tick-tock is the message. we shouldn't get that hung up on these deadlines. as adam said, they are there to be broken. lots of things have been said. we were told by the eu that the withdrawal agreement could not be reopened or negotiated, but that seems to be going on here. i think it was a matter of a few hours, then they would continue. they have this issue that the summit is due to start on thursday, but there is nothing to stop them going beyond that. the problem boris johnson has got is that he is up against this issue of the so—called ben act, which means if no deal has gone through by the 19th then he has to, by law, ask for the eu to stop brexit. we just want to do that. his deadline is looking more like later than the 31st of october. on the uk
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side, they are trying to give themselves as much flexibility as possible. the fact kavanagh did not meet this morning, that meeting has been postponed until tomorrow, maybe even tomorrow afternoon. —— the fact cabinet. to make sure that they have enough time before they start breaching the cabinet. not much coming out of the uk side on this. they sounded optimistic a couple of days ago after that meeting between leo varadkar and boris johnson. clearly there is some sort of political breakthrough there, if you like. the problem is those warm words and agreements from those leaders has to be translated into technical legal documents. that is thejob of michel technical legal documents. that is the job of michel barnier. that is what he is very much asking the uk government to do. because, of course, it is all about the detail. with so much up in the air, we don't know if it is going to be much of a super saturday. that's right, and not just talking about the rugby matches. the fact parliament was due to be sitting at 930 in the morning,
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so we were told by downing street, it was never totally confirmed. what we are hearing now from jacob rees mogg is that they mightjust decide quite last minute to recall parliament. rather than having a motion put down, devote done on thursday, instead they could decide probably as late as friday morning to recall parliament. —— get the vote done on thursday. will have to wait and see if that happens. from the government's point of view, there is no point doing it unless there is no point doing it unless there is no point doing it unless there is something to talk about, something to vote on. you could see the path there might be if they were to bea the path there might be if they were to be a deal. you would bring it back to the house of commons and have a meaningful vote. if there isn't, then what happens? they have this issue of does borisjohnson send that letter to the eu saying, right, i'm now going to ask for a delay to brexit. he clearly doesn't wa nt to delay to brexit. he clearly doesn't want to do that. the law says he must. the other thing by doing a
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recall of parliament last minute, it does mean that all of the torque there has been about the opposition parties seizing control of the agenda in the commons again, it's much harderfor them to do it because at the moment there is nothing on the agenda for saturday. thanks very much. the first minister of scotland is about to close her party's conference in aberdeen. let's go to our correspondence there to hear what we can expect. obviously brexit is dominating this? yes, what an extraordinary time for the first minister of scotland, nicola sturgeon, to be giving a keynote speech at the snp conference here in aberdeen. just days to go, we still don't know what the future of the country is, including scotland, going to be. one of the themes will be a contrast between her style of leadership and what she characterises as the so—called strongman leadership that, as she
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would see it, we see coming from leaders like boris johnson would see it, we see coming from leaders like borisjohnson and donald trump. she will say that she rejects crude populism as she styles it. as she chooses to do things, as she describes it, the right way. and talking about how she wants to get independence, by seeking permission from westminster for it to happen. and contrasting that with what happened with the suspension of parliament when the supreme court, of course, ruled that the prime minister, borisjohnson, of course, ruled that the prime minister, boris johnson, had of course, ruled that the prime minister, borisjohnson, had acted unlawfully. it is that contrast she will want to emphasise between what happens in scotland and what is happening in westminster. i think she will also paint a picture. she will create a vision for the party faithful hear about what scotland might look like in the future. an independent scotland, as she would hope, back in the european union after brexit. and she will describe it as after brexit. and she will describe itasa after brexit. and she will describe it as a bridge between europe and
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the european union and post—brexit britain, a place that would attract international investment. that's the kind of vision she is going to sum up kind of vision she is going to sum upfor kind of vision she is going to sum up for the members here. that speech about to start very shortly, we expect. the audiencejust expect. the audience just clapping, we are expecting her to appear on stage. i am just watching what is going on... she is on a warfooting, like am just watching what is going on... she is on a war footing, like every body else, because quite soon there could be a general election will stop that's right. i don't know about your twitter feed but mine is co nsta ntly about your twitter feed but mine is constantly filled with announcements from people saying, i'm delighted to say i have been chosen. and i think we can now, simon, iam hearing say i have been chosen. and i think we can now, simon, i am hearing that we can now, simon, i am hearing that we can now join we can now, simon, i am hearing that we can nowjoin the speech by the leader of the snp, first minister of scotland, nicola sturgeon.” leader of the snp, first minister of scotland, nicola sturgeon. i don't know which pictures you are looking at! chuckles mine suggests she is not at the
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podium yet. leave it to me. i will tell you. i promise. give us a sense. of course, the general election, and also calls for an independence referendum sooner rather than later, as well. yes, the snp desperately want that, but they know there are these obstacles which have to be overcome before it can happen. obviously they would say that they are not insurmountable, that they are not insurmountable, that it that they are not insurmountable, thatitis that they are not insurmountable, that it is possible, and she is going to ask for the permission for westminster to allow it to happen before the end of the year. she hopes that an actual referendum could happen next year at the end of 2020. that would actually mean quite a short campaign. probably only about six months, compared to the very long campaign that we had at the beginning of 2012, running all the beginning of 2012, running all the way into 2014. they would hope to be able to seize the initiative, those moments after brexit happens,
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if it happens, when there might be this surge in scotland in favour of independence, as opposed to staying pa rt independence, as opposed to staying part of a post brexit britain. there is no doubt there has been a benefit for the snp, ironically, is no doubt there has been a benefit forthe snp, ironically, in is no doubt there has been a benefit for the snp, ironically, in brexit taking place, because it has meant that people who previously would not have been in favour of independence might not have been supporters of the snp, have been tempted to support them, have moved over to the snp, because they see them as a party which is not in favour of brexit, and the majority of scotland was that brexit should not happen. the majority of scotland were in favour of remain. that is the kind of wave the snp have been riding for the past two, three years. if brexit does not happen, that actually might be quite damaging for the snp, because it means that those people who are supporting them at the
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moment may no longer do so, but i think we can finally now hear from nicola sturgeon. chuckles thanks, james. we can go there now. applause if you are sitting comfortably... conference, i want to talk to you today about two futures. about a choice of two futures. for our
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country, and for our world. you know, there are times in history where fundamental decisions have to be made. decisions guided by our values, and by our hopes for future generations. choices that involve standing upfor generations. choices that involve standing up for what is right. this is such a moment. politics today is dominated in too many countries by strongman leaders with inflated egos and an overbearing sense of entitlement. applause the uk has a prime minister who has acted unlawfully. he cares nothing, nothing for the human consequences of his disastrous brexit policy. indeed, virtually every day since he
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entered downing street, boris johnson has demonstrated on every level that he is thoroughly unfit for the office he holds. applause and across the atlantic... laughter the current incumbent of the white house, injust his the current incumbent of the white house, in just his latest outrage, has allowed a war in the middle east to re—erupt. has allowed a war in the middle east to re—eru pt. conference, has allowed a war in the middle east to re—erupt. conference, let us today make clear our strong opposition to turkish aggression in northern syria. applause kurds in syria have been on the front line against isis. now they
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and their children are being bombed. what is happening is unconscionable. it must stop now. applause what leaders like boris johnson what leaders like borisjohnson and donald trump have in common is this, a belief that nothing should be allowed to stand in the way of their own self—interest. not facts or evidence. not the rule of law. not democracy. in some cases not even basic human rights. friends, we oppose the politics ofjohnson and trump, but let us... applause let us be clear today that we reject their methods, too. crude populism tramples on the rights of democracies and trends on the fabric
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of our democracy. that is not for us, that is not who we are. applause these can seem like dark times, but there is light, and there is always hope. progressive values are being fought for in europe. young people are taking a stand for their future. and for scotland, the hope lies in becoming an independent nation. applause be in no doubt about this, we are winning the case for independence. cheering the great billy connelly said last
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week, that if scotland would like independence he would like it, too. he said, scotland is in great shape. politically it is an extraordinary shape. conference, humbly, iagree. -- billy shape. conference, humbly, iagree. —— billy connolly. and as for scotla nd —— billy connolly. and as for scotland putting up for governments we don't vote for, he said they won't take it any more. he used a less polite word, but you get the drift. and he's right, we won't take it any more, we shouldn't take it any more, it is time to take charge of our own future, it is time, conference, for independence. cheering
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we will win our independence. but not the brexit way. not by undermining democracy. demonising those who disagree. and plastering lies on the side of a bus. we will win by inspiring and persuading. so, let us resolve today, that how we campaignfor let us resolve today, that how we campaign for independence will always, always reflect the open, tolerant, inclusive, and democratic nation we are determined to build. applause auk a uk that seemed possible to many just five years ago no longer exists. and the uk that was said to be impossible is now all too real.
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you know, ivividly be impossible is now all too real. you know, i vividly remember in 2014 the director of the no campaign being asked about the prospect of borisjohnson becoming being asked about the prospect of boris johnson becoming tory leader. he said it was, and i quote, a scare story. chuckles coming from the architect of project fear, that was quite the accolade. it was a bit like being told to stop swearing by malcolm tucker! laughter but his reasoning was this, boris johnson would only become tory leader if the tories lost the next election and got rid of david cameron. he said the yes campaign had to decide whether it was scaremongering about endless tory government or about boris johnson. it couldn't be both. well, guess what? we did get both. the tories are still in power, borisjohnson is prime minister, and those who lead
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that no campaign will never be trusted by the people of scotland ever again. applause they told us to vote no, to stay in the eu. they told us that we would lead the uk. they said we would lead the uk. they said we would enjoy a union dividend. but instead we suffered years of tory austerity. we face job losses and a brexit procession. we are even having to plan for shortages of food and medicine. friends, i don't know about you, i think there is something else we are sort of. scotla nd something else we are sort of. scotland is short of an abject apology from the tories, labour and the liberals for all of those broken
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promises. applause it is because of those broken promises that scotland faces removal from the european union now. brexit isa from the european union now. brexit is a disaster. whatever happens over these next few weeks it will continue to dominate westminster for yea rs continue to dominate westminster for years to come. there is no sense in which it will be done. we don't know yet whether the uk will leave with a deal or without, but we do know that neither of these outcomes is in scotland's interests. no—deal brexit is unthinkable and for the scottish tories in particular, to back such an outcome is simply unforgivable. applause
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but the deal of the type boris johnson is proposing would not be much better. his plans would take scotla nd much better. his plans would take scotland out of the eu, out of the single market, and out of the customs union. conference, let me make this absolutely clear today. snp mp5 make this absolutely clear today. snp mps will not vote for that, not now, not ever. applause it would leave us facing a future relationship with the eu that is even more distant than that envisaged by theresa may. from boris johnson's plan is any guarantee of protection for environmental rights, food safety, consumers rights, workers' rights, all of that has been sacrificed on the altar of a trade deal with donald trump. on that issue, i have a message for
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this and any future uk government. if you ever try to barter with the quality of scotland's food or the beauty of our environment, and if you ever dare put scotland's precious nhs up for sale, the snp will fight you every single step of the way. cheering and applause what makes brexit so much worse for scotla nd what makes brexit so much worse for scotland is that it is happening against our will. one of the sticking points in the negotiations with the eu has been the issue of consent for northern ireland. if there is to be a deal it seems inevitable that it will include a process to allow northern ireland to decide if and for how long it will stay aligned to the single market
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and the customs union. and that's exactly as it should be. but think about what that will mean. wales will have voted to leave, england will have voted to leave, england will have voted to leave, northern ireland will be given a say over its future is that scotland will be the only country in the uk to be taken out of the eu against our will and with no say over our future relationship with europe. that is not a partnership of equals. that is a denial of fairness and basic democracy. applause brexit is a disaster. but it is a symptom of a deeper problem. that problem is the westminster political union. for scotland, brexit shows that the westminster system is
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broken and it is broken utterly beyond repair. conference, we have a cast—iron mandate for an independence referendum. that fact is beyond doubt. applause but we don't just applause but we don'tjust have a right to offer the people of scotland a choice of the future. in the circumstances, scotland now faces, we have a duty to do so and that is what we intend to do. applause but let me be clear about this. the process by which we choose scotland's future must be capable of actually achieving independence. it must allow majority support to be
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expressed clearly and unambiguously. it must be legal and it must have the recognition of the international community. why? because ourjob is not just to deliver a community. why? because ourjob is notjust to deliver a referendum, conference, ourjob is to deliver independence. cheering and applause and michael is that the referendum must happen next year. and we are getting ready. —— my call. cheering and applause
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and we are... applause and we are getting ready. laughter by laughter by the new year we will have completed our legislative preparations. we are already working to update the independence prospectus. and i can confirm today that before the end of this year i will demand a transfer of power that puts the legality of that referendum beyond any doubt. cheering and
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applause and friends, when i do, the question should not be to the snp, what will we do if westminster refuses? the question should be demanded of the westminster parties, but gives you any right to deny people in scotla nd you any right to deny people in scotland the ability to choose our own future? applause
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laughter conference, the westminster refusal is not sustainable. we can already see the cracks appearing. the labour leadership is in london and wales have recognised a right to choose. they make scottish labour look even more ridiculous than normal. laughter all of the other parties are so lacking in confidence that a referendum can be blocked that they are now trying to rig the question. just like us, they know there is going to be a referendum and they know that when there is, scotland will choose independence. applause
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support is rising. our task is to build it even further and make the demand irresistible. and soon we will have the chance to show the strength of public opinion. a general election is imminent and it cannot come soon enough. applause when it does, our message will be clear, simple and unambiguous. vote snp to demand independence and secure scotland's right to choose. applause and some polls suggest that an election might result in a hung
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parliament. welcome the snp will never put the tories into power, but i have a message for any westminster party that once snp support. if you don't respect scotland's right to choose our own future at the time of our own choosing, don't even bother picking up the phone. cheering and applause conference, year after year, decade after decade, decisions about our future have been made by westminster governments that scotland has rejected. those decisions have taken their toll on scotland. and they have shattered the case for the union. for some people that case will have rested on the great nationalised industries of the post—war era. but those industries
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we re post—war era. but those industries were abandoned by a tory government scotla nd were abandoned by a tory government scotland did not vote for. for others it will be the welfare state, a welfare state that is being dismantled by another government we didn't vote for. and for many, it will have been deficient of an open, tolerant, outward —looking society and a shared future in europe. but even that is being taken away from us even that is being taken away from us bya even that is being taken away from us by a government scotland did not vote for. conference, i say enough. enough of governments scotland did not fit for imposing policies we do not fit for imposing policies we do not support. applause when i talk to people who are now open to independence, even though they voted no in 2014, what strikes me as this, their priorities haven't shifted. they still want an economy
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that works for ordinary people. they wa nt that works for ordinary people. they want a social security system that is there when they need it. and they wa nt is there when they need it. and they wantan is there when they need it. and they want an equal partnership and the chance to play our full part in europe. those sentiments haven't changed. but the way to achieve them has. the commitments made to the post—war generations have been broken. but thejust post—war generations have been broken. but the just and fair society that was promised can still be realised. it will be realised now when together we when our country's independence. applause conference, it is inexplicable to me that anyone who cares about social justice would want to leave powers at westminster when that so often means leaving them in the hands of right—wing tory governments. and i think it would be inexplicable today
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to the pioneers of the scottish labour party, james maxton one of the great figures of the labour movement spoke about the campaign for home rule back in the 19205. his words are worth quoting in full, so please indulge me, give us our parliament in scotland, he said. set it up next year. we will start with new traditions, we will start with ideals. men and women will spend their whole energy, their whole brain power, whole courage and their whole soul in making scotland into a country in which we can take people from all nations of the earth and say this is our land, this is our scotland, these are our people, these are our men, or works, our women and children, can you beat it? conference, if that is not a modern day definition of independence i don't know what is. it's time to com plete don't know what is. it's time to complete that home rule journey. it is time for independence to build a
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better society. cheering and applause in these turbulent times, ourjob is to bring hope, to be the confidence builders. and the best place to start is always with the facts. scotland's national income is higher per head in countries like france, japan and new zealand. so do not ever let anyone tell you that scotla nd ever let anyone tell you that scotland is not rich enough to be independent, because we most certainly are. applause we have extraordinary strengths in energy, science and research, food and drink, tourism, financial
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services, creative industries, manufacturing, digital technology, so don't let them tell you that scotland's economy is not strong enough to be independent either, or that we are not big enough. seven out of the ten wealthiest developed countries are of a size similar to or smaller than scotland. from luxembourg to ireland, from austria to switzerland and norway, countries of our size are leading the world. and they tend to be happier as well. applause it's true. eight out of ten of the world's happiest countries have populations similar to or smaller than ours. now, i am populations similar to or smaller than ours. now, iam not populations similar to or smaller than ours. now, i am not aware of the unionist parties trying to tell us the unionist parties trying to tell us that we are too miserable to be
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independent yet, but when that day inevitably comes, you now know the answer. conference, the serious point is this. we are a wealthy country, bursting with talent and potential. this is abbott scotland. rich enough, strong enough, big enough to take our place among the proud independent nations of the world, and that is what we must now do. applause brexit in any form puts our asperity at risk, so we must reject a post brexit race to the bottom and embrace instead a race tojoin brexit race to the bottom and embrace instead a race to join that top tier of independent nations. and consider this, as an independent
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european country, scotland will have a unique advantage. we will be in the eu single market and the closest neighbour to ourfriends the eu single market and the closest neighbour to our friends in the the eu single market and the closest neighbour to ourfriends in the rest of the uk. a bridge between europe and the uk making our country a magnet for global investment. conference, that's what i call the best of both worlds. applause the foundations for independence are strong. the value of independence lies in the opportunity to build a fairer country. the twin hallmarks of this tory government have been welfare cuts for the poor and tax cuts for the rich. pensioners are being short—changed to. the uk state pension is the lowest in the developed world. to add insult to injury, westminster has robbed women born in the 19505 of their pension
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entitlement. that is shameful. conference... applause the snp stands with the loss be women. the uk government must give them back the money that is theirs by right. —— the waspi women. applause but in pensions that could be even worse in store. a think tank set up by iain duncan smith, that architect of universal credit, has suggested that the pension age should rise to 75. i say to the tories today, if you ever try to bring this in, the snp will oppose it all the way. but
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with independence, we could make our own choices. we can take responsibility and set our own priorities. and we can also decide what we don't want to spend money on. nuclear weapons are immoral but they are also a massive waste of money. applause with independence we can and we will get rid of trident nuclear missiles from the clyde once and for all. cheering and applause and here's another idea for saving some cash. the house of lords. cheering the second biggest legislative chamber in the world after the national people's congress of china. you know, in one term there were 63
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piers who failed to speak at all! they still claim more than £1 million between them just for being there. the house of lords is undemocratic and outdated and with independence we won't have to contribute a single penny towards it. we can have a modern parliament with a written constitution instead. cheering and applause our task is to build confidence in the strength of our economy and in our vision of a fairer, more democratic country. and through our actions in government we will continue to build confidence in the value of decision—making here in scotland. it was the czech writer turned politician who said vision who was not enough, it must be
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combined with venture. it is not enough to stir up the steps, we must stare up the stairs. so let me tell you how we are stepping up for a better scotland. the most important obligation, moral obligation. we owe to future generations, to bequeath to future generations, to bequeath to them a planet in good health. applause the young climate activist greta thunberg has faced a predictable barrage of criticism from certain quarters. those who hurl insults at her should take a long hard look at themselves. applause yes, her message can be uncomfortable for political leaders, that's the point. she is absolutely right to challenge us to do more.
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and so are the millions of young people around the world who are campaigning alongside her. they are doing the world a service and we thank them for it. applause the urgency and global scale of the climate emergency means we must work across borders. now is the moment for the world to show what it is capable of. let us resolve today that scotland will lead the way. we are already a world leader in renewable energy, and new sources of power. this wonderful new conference venue is an example of that. hydrogen fuel cells are powering the whole in which we are gathered right now. we have already... applause we have already halved our greenhouse gas emissions and i am very proud that just last greenhouse gas emissions and i am very proud thatjust last month we passed legislation to ensure that scotla nd passed legislation to ensure that scotland will be a net zero
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emissions nation by 2045, years ahead of the rest of the uk. that is leadership. applause from electric cars to electric trains and even electric planes, we are leading the way. of course, the climate emergency demands that there are some new technologies we must say no to. earlier this month we set out ourfinal say no to. earlier this month we set out our final policy and unconventional oil and gas. we listened to the evidence, we considered the impact on climate change, and we came to this conclusion. our snp government will not issue any new licences fracking. there will be no fracking in scotland. applause you've probably heard the phrase, think globally, act locally. it's an
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idea attributed to a scot, the planner and conservationist patrick geddes from his writing 100 years ago. it sums up the challenge we face today. scotland is leading globally but we must support local action also. we are investing £500 million in new bus infrastructure to make journeys, faster, greener and more convenient. we want people to walk and cycle more, too. reducing our carbon footprint and improving our carbon footprint and improving our health. so i can announce today new investment for local projects the length and breadth of our nation. from eire to aberdeen, a fund of £27 million will support more than 200 schemes to make it easierfor people to more than 200 schemes to make it easier for people to cycle and walk. that is acting locally as we lead globally in making our contribution to tackling the climate emergency.
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—— from ayr to aberdeen. we are taking steps to tackle inequality also. the social security system should be there to narrow the gap between rich and poor. the tory welfare policy is widening that gap. 8500 scottish families have already had their income cut by the universal credit two child limit. by the time it is fully rolled out, up to 20,000 children will have been pushed into poverty. contrast that with the work of our scottish government. we are introducing the new scottish child payment. that has been described by the child poverty action group is a game changer. the first payments of £10 per week will be made by christmas next year when it is fully implemented, more than 400,000 children will benefit. and let me...
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applause let me be crystal clear about this, the scottish child payment will have no to child cap and no apparent rape clause. —— abhorrent. conference, there is the difference between the tories and the snp in a nutshell. they push children into poverty, the snp lifts them up. applause we know that injustice extends beyond financial inequality. we have a responsibility to help all those who are vulnerable. we have already taken important steps to protect women and girls from domestic abuse. scotla nd women and girls from domestic abuse. scotland has led the way with ground—breaking legislation that criminalises psychological as well as physical abuse. but organisations
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like scottish women's aid told us to go further. we need to change the reality that for women and their children, often the only way to escape an abuser is to flee their home. for too many that results in the victims of abuse becoming homeless. so i can announce today that within this parliamentary term, we will introduce a new law to establish emergency protective orders. conference, it should not be the victims of abuse who lose their homes, it should be the perpetrators, and these orders will make that happen. applause conference, up and down our country, every day, our fellow citizens are cared for by our national health service. in hospitals, health
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centres and in people's own homes area centres and in people's own homes are a fantastic nhs and social care staff are hard at work. let us thank them today for all that they do. applause the care they provide is free at the point of need. free personal care was one of the proudest achievements of the early days of devolution, and iam of the early days of devolution, and i am proud that in april of this year, oursnp i am proud that in april of this year, our snp government extended into everyone who needs it, regardless of age. applause the principle behind free personal ca re the principle behind free personal care is the same is behind free health care. if you need help, you should get it, but despite that principle many people of all ages still have to pay for nonresidential social care services. i know from my
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own constituency experiences that charges can be a real barrier to people accessing the support they need, and if they can't get that support in their own homes, they are more likely to end up in hospital. so today i make this pledge. if i am re—elected as first minister in the holyrood elections, then over the next parliament, the snp will scrap nonresidential social care charges for everyone. applause friends, when i became first minister, i set my government a clear priority. education. and there is no policy more transformational and with more potential to raise attainment in the years to come than
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the expansion of early learning and child care. by august next year, we will have all but doubled the hours children receive. they will benefit from 30 hours a week of high quality free care and education, and it will save families £4500 a year for each child. conference, that is worth more than any tax cut any tory government is ever going to deliver to ha rd—pressed families government is ever going to deliver to hard—pressed families in scotland. applause but we will not stop there. we are consulting already on the next phase of our expansion. we will have more to say on this in the months to come, but i am making one important commitment today. if the snp is returned to government after the next holyrood election, we will expand childcare into the school
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holidays for primary pupils from the poorest backgrounds. applause full days of high quality childcare, freeing parents to work to help them lift theirfamilies freeing parents to work to help them lift their families out of poverty. conference, we are building confidence in the power of decision making to change lives here in scotland. in government, we put ideals and our values into practice, and we do so for everyone who lives in scotland, no matter where they come from. applause we believe in equal rights. that's why we have introduced a new law to extend the right to vote in the
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scottish elections to citizens of all nationalities legally resident here. to everyone, everyone. to every single person who chooses to make our country their home, my message is this. you are welcome here, we value you with all our hearts, we want you to stay and you have as much right to vote in our countries elections as anyone else does. applause that is a demonstration of the kind of country we are seeking to build. an independent scotland will be a voice that celebrates and champions diversity. they will be no hostile environment for migrants in an independent scotland. applause
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and the snp will always speak up without fear or favour for democracy and human rights. as first minister, i understand only too well the importance of the rule of law, and of standing up for it in these troubled times, but any law, any law that sends politicians to prison for organising a vote is a law that surely needs to change. applause the politicians and activists from
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catalonia given prison sentences yesterday by a spanish court our peaceful campaigners for the right to self—determination. just like we are. i can't imagine what they and theirfamilies are are. i can't imagine what they and their families are going through, but i do ask you to join their families are going through, but i do ask you tojoin me in sending them our support and solidarity. applause
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conference, it is time for scotland to choose our own future. it is time to choose our own future. it is time to reclaim our independence. i don't know about you but i am utterly sick of westminster. applause i'm sick of brexit. applause and i have had more than enough of people like jacob rees—mogg lording it over us while lounging across the benches of the house of commons as if he owns the place. actually, come to think of it, he probably does own the place. the people of scotland are seeing all of this for what it
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is, a broken political system. a so—called union that imposes on scotla nd so—called union that imposes on scotland time and again governments we don't vote for. that system is unsustainable, and it's time is coming to an end. and what will be billed in its place? take a moment to remember those heady, invigorating, life affirming days in the late summer of 2014, days when anything seemed possible, when the dream of working as if we lived in the early days of as if we lived in the early days of a better nation was more than just the words of a poet, and now capture that spirit as we look forward to the future. scotland's contribution to human progress down the ages is
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immeasurable, but perhaps our greatest contribution will be this. a new country, founded on hope and a vision of shared humanity and compassion, a light in a world that seems dark. you know, the irish historian owen dudley edwards, once wrote this. "i discovered i had become scottish long before i arrived here. to be scottish was to enter the world of scottish imagination. to be scots is . be imagination. to be scots is to be told that you are welcome and make yourself at home". and what is that idea of being home? it's feeling safe and secure and loved, a place where everyone '5 ideas and talents can thrive, a place of comfort, a home for laughter and joy for eve ryo ne home for laughter and joy for everyone who comes here, no matter where you are from, that is the scotla nd where you are from, that is the scotland we are seeking to build.
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applause friends, these are turbulent times. none of us have known anything like it, but we do have guiding lights to chart our way. our spirits, it, but we do have guiding lights to chart ourway. ourspirits, our values, our vision, our commitment to empowerment and democracy and our unsha keable belief in to empowerment and democracy and our unshakeable belief in the abilities and the wisdom of the scottish people. it is time to play scotland's future in scotland's hands. applause to ta ke hands. applause to take our own decisions and chart our own course. that is time to play our own course. that is time to play our part in building a better world. friends, in the immortal words of
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robert burns, it is coming yet for all that. applause the world is waiting for it, so let's win our nation's independence. cheering so bringing the snp conference to a close, the first minister, leader of the snp, nicola sturgeon, saying scotla nd the snp, nicola sturgeon, saying scotland could act as a bridge between the eu and the uk and be a magnet for global investment after brexit. closing their party's conference in aberdeen, she said being inside the eu single market and close to the uk would give scotla nd and close to the uk would give scotland a unique advantage, and some fairly personal attacks on
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borisjohnson some fairly personal attacks on boris johnson and what some fairly personal attacks on borisjohnson and what has been happening in the last few days in london with the brexit negotiations, describing him as having a sense of entitlement and being not up to the job. she told party members that we must reject a post—brexit race to the bottom and embrace instead a race tojoin the the bottom and embrace instead a race to join the top tier of independent nations, and as an independent nations, and as an independent european country, scotla nd independent european country, scotland would have a unique advantage. we will be in the eu single market and also the closest member to ourfriends single market and also the closest member to our friends in the single market and also the closest member to ourfriends in the rest single market and also the closest member to our friends in the rest of the uk, a bridge between the eu and the uk, a bridge between the eu and the uk, a bridge between the eu and the uk, making our country a magnet for global investment, she said the best of both worlds. so bringing as i say the conference to an end there in aberdeen, and we will have analysis of her speech and indeed of how the snp's conference has gone a little late in the programme.
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meanwhile, the european union's chief brexit negotiator says a needs to be agreed by midnight tonight with the uk if it is to be signed off at the summit of eu leaders on thursday for stop michel barnier said a deal would be difficult to achieve but is still possible as long as legal text is agreed today. it comes after the uk put forward new proposals for customs arrangements. downing street says borisjohnson is aware of time constraints and wants to make progress as soon as possible. our europe correspondent adam fleming has this report. what felt like all of europe was waiting to hear, if the brexit talks were making progress. even if the agreement will be difficult, more and more difficult, we think it is still possible this week. looking tired after negotiations went into the night michel barnier chose every word carefully. reaching an agreement... ..is still possible. obviously, any agreement
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must work for everyone. inside, he laid out the timeline for ministers and the 27 other countries. if there is to be a deal for eu leaders to approve at their summit starting on thursday, that deal would have to be agreed by tonight, tuesday, but, in brexit, deadlines exist to be missed. it is, of course, possible to move beyond the summit, and to continue talks next week. that is feasible because the uk isn't due to leave the european union until the end of the month. but from everybody‘s perspective, if we could provide clarity at this leaders summit that would be a welcome development. we have a high level of solidarity with ireland from the beginning. and we try to protect the integrity of the markets. if it is possible to stick to such a red line it is possible to have a deal. then we will see if it is also possible for the british parliament to agree on that.
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will there be a deal tonight? in london, the prime minister welcomed an observer of this process, the nato secretary general. if the pm seals the deal with his other european colleagues it'll have to be approved by parliament, and notjust that, it'll have to be turned into british law, too, which means more votes. parliament, once it has agreed something, can legislate something very quickly. if the meaningful vote goes through, the legislation will merely be the ratification in domestic law of the treaty, and that, i think, is a relatively easy bill to pass if there is a deal. what matters now is whether the negotiating team can work their magic in brussels. there will still be differences, like the customs check on the island of ireland, and the shape of any future trade agreements. gaps that have to be bridged injust a matter of hours or there will not be a deal this week.
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that was adam fleming. this is leo varadkar, the irish taoiseach of course, he has just varadkar, the irish taoiseach of course, he hasjust been varadkar, the irish taoiseach of course, he has just been asked about progress in the brexit talks, and he says initial indicators are we are making progress, he said, and moving in the right direction. but tuesday, a busy day for the irish prime minister, he has a cabinet meeting and prime minister's questions, so he has just and prime minister's questions, so he hasjust said he and prime minister's questions, so he has just said he will be getting a full briefing a little later, and of course no doubt we will be talking to the media a little later about that. so that's what's happening there in dublin. let's talk now to a senior research fellow, at an independent eu think tank. we are all aware of a change in the mood music, but what michel barnier and the eu needs now is fa cts , barnier and the eu needs now is facts, legal documents. yes, absolutely, and that is indeed what michel barnier was indicating today.
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he said obviously the deadline for any breakthrough but that also means actually getting over with the legal text, and obviously the legal text, there has been bits that are contentious, and we have to bear in mind that the european council, so the eu leaders who will gather later this week, they won't really dwell into the legal text, so it needs to be ready for them to see any white smoke coming of the european council building. as long as that is not the documents themselves being burned in frustration. let's work on the basis there is progress. it looks now is of some sort of extension to something is going to be required. yes. as barnier was saying today, it is still possible to reach a breakthrough today. but it seems to me it is going to be very difficult. so if both negotiating parties do
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not actually finalise or sort of reach a consensus or customs checks, but also perhaps on the future, sort of how the future relationship should be vaguely defined in the political declaration, then i think the chances for this white smoke that i just referred the chances for this white smoke that ijust referred to are close to zero. but, you know, there is still a chance the european council leaders who will meet on thursday and friday could take stock of the negotiations and say well, we see the light in the tunnel, so why won't we meet again next week? but that obviously as you know creates problems for boris johnson that obviously as you know creates problems for borisjohnson himself, because the benn act kicks in and requiresjohnson to ask because the benn act kicks in and requires johnson to ask for an extension. the problem with seeing light at the end of the tunnel is that it can be a train moving towards you, and ijust wonder, is there progress being made or is there progress being made or is there a lot of we are doing what we
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can and that blame game going on behind—the—scenes already?m can and that blame game going on behind-the-scenes already? it might not be particularly helpful to you but really it is difficult to say, and i've been talking today with people following the negotiations, and usually well informed, and they actually sort of were really kept in the dark, which is not bad news by itself, so it seems to me we will really have to wait until midnight, but having said that, it looks like, you know, both sides are willing to strike an agreement, and that is in itself good news, isn't it? and of course the leaders could always decide instead of thursday, they will meet thursday whatever, tell you what, let's all have another meeting next week. that's exactly what i was referring to, and that is indeed the talk of this town. it is quite likely that we would have yet
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another european council summit, and i think the eu leaders wouldn't mind making all this way to brussels again if they thought there was the prospect for an agreement. but then, even though today we are not talking about this, even if the deal was reached before the end of october, i find it actually very difficult to imagine that we would be on time with the ratification, both in the british parliament and in the european parliament, so i wouldn't actually exclude yet another short but technical extension. this is something that would be easier to sell for borisjohnson something that would be easier to sell for boris johnson than just something that would be easier to sell for borisjohnson than just an extension to another uncertainty. really good to talk to you, thank you for that. let's return to aberdeen where we have just seen the snp leader nicola sturgeon. she has bring her party's conference to an end that speech of
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hers. our correspondent james shaw is there. pretty much as build, wasn't it? some pretty harsh words for borisjohnson. wasn't it? some pretty harsh words for boris johnson. yes, that's true, but i think the most noteworthy thing about it, simon, was the passage about a third of the way through, where she was talking about the timing of a second independence referendum. i don't know if the audience at home will have picked it up, but the response in the hall was really electric to that. first of all, people started stamping their feet, then they started standing up and applauding, so a standing ovation, and in fact during that pa rt of ovation, and in fact during that part of the speech, they did it three times, and i suppose they were sending a message to the outside world but may be also to the leadership of the snp that that is absolute critical priority for them. don't worry about brexit, don't worry about all these other domestic policies, the real thing that we ca re policies, the real thing that we care about is getting independent and getting it as quickly as possible. that was the message i think that came across, but as you say, nicola sturgeon's speech was much more wide—ranging than that.
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she did attack borisjohnson much more wide—ranging than that. she did attack boris johnson and donald trump, what she called so—called strongman leadership, and she criticised him for what she called crude populism and tearing at the fabric of our democracy, as she described it, and she was referring thenl described it, and she was referring then i think to the fact that boris johnson's attempts to suspend parliament of course was ruled unlawful by supreme court judges just a few weeks ago. so that was an important passage, but then also she offered a kind of vision of the future for scotland, the possibility that it could be a bridge post—brexit that it could be a bridge post— brexit between that it could be a bridge post—brexit between europe and the re st of post—brexit between europe and the rest of britain. that could bring investment from around the world to scotland, but that vision of course as we stand at the moment is still quite a long way away. thank you, james shaw in aberdeen. there has been a 10% rise in reported hate crimes in england and wales
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according to new home office figures that show a record number of offences recorded in the past year. race hate crimes accounted for around three quarters of the recorded offences, a rise of 11% on the year before to 78,981. reports of transgender hate crime went up 37%. the orientation hit reports increased by 25%, and disability hate reports went up by 14%. but a word of warning, these figures could be down to better recording by the police and a growing awareness of hate crime. we can speak to kim leadbitter, the sister of the mpjo cox was murdered by a right—wing extremist, and now campaigns against hate crimes. thank you for your time. i wonder, hate crimes. thank you for your time. iwonder, does hate crimes. thank you for your time. i wonder, does this illustrate better powers of recording or the fa ct better powers of recording or the fact that the country right now is a pretty angry place? fact that the country right now is a pretty angry place ?” fact that the country right now is a pretty angry place? i think it is potentially a bit of both. the fact that incidents are being recorded more readily is a really positive
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thing but that doesn't detract from the fact that there is still clearly a problem with the number of attacks and incidents of hate crime we are seeing across the country. we have seenin seeing across the country. we have seen in the last few weeks a lot of discussion about the type of language used principally in parliament but also elsewhere. is that play a part here?” parliament but also elsewhere. is that play a part here? i think it does. we are working very hard through the jo cox foundation does. we are working very hard through thejo cox foundation to try and tackle some of the issues we are facing as a society, and the way i think we have to do that is a top down and a bottom—up approach, and i think what we need is leadership from politicians and others in the public eye to conduct themselves in a respectful and civilised manner, and what we also need to look at issues and understand where anger and frustration is coming from and try tojoin up and frustration is coming from and try to join up the two. so our call to action today for the main political parties was to sign up to a standard of conduct for all politicians and members of parliament to sign up to, so that is one thing we are doing, and as i say, a lot of the work we do through
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jo's foundation is at a grassroots level, and trying to bring people together through the great get—together campaign, which i think can easily be dismissed as something around just getting together and having a nice time, which it certainly is, but it is about much more than that, bringing people together across lines of difference so we understand disability and race and lgbt so we understand disability and race and lg bt issues. so we understand disability and race and lgbt issues. these are important issues and they are big jobs, but through issues and they are big jobs, but throutho's issues and they are big jobs, but through jo's foundation we are issues and they are big jobs, but throutho's foundation we are not shying away from this work. just afterjo's murder, we all remember the replaying of her maiden speech and part of that speech, which talked about as having more income in and! talked about as having more income in and i know that is a central theme of the work you are now doing. have we lost our way since she was murdered? i think unfortunately we have, and i think there are some things that started before jo was killed, but certainly around the time whenjo was killed there was a real sense of anger and frustration across the country, and then there was the real brief moment of time where politicians and others had all
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the right things about doing things differently and being kinder and more compassionate, and i think u nfortu nately more compassionate, and i think unfortunately it is fair to say things have got worse since that time. but that doesn't mean we should give up hope and we should stop trying, we all need to work ha rd stop trying, we all need to work hard on this, and actually nor did it mean there are a lot of amazing people at another country doing wonderful and amazing things. the u nfortu nate wonderful and amazing things. the unfortunate thing is it is often the more controversial statistics that make the headlines and that is again where i think the media has responsibility to cover things happening around the country. it is a year ago today since the government's strategy on loneliness was released and we have seen all sorts of action up and down the country on people trying to tackle loneliness and social isolation so there is an awful lot of good stuff out there going on, we need to talk about that a lot more, focus on that about that a lot more, focus on that a lot more without shying away from theissues a lot more without shying away from the issues that still need attention. as i say, one of the things today is very much calling on the leaders of all the main political parties to sign up to a standard of conduct that they are dear to standard of conduct that they are dearto and standard of conduct that they are dear to and then hopefully the rest of us can follow with good
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leadership on this important matter. soa leadership on this important matter. so a bit more good news on channels like this one? absolutely, i think thatis like this one? absolutely, i think that is really important and actually people really like it. people want to hear good stories and i think the media have a responsibility and i think the only way that things will change, particularly if we are looking at hate crime and issues across communities is everybody take some responsibility. so this has to come from political leaders, celebrities, people in the world of sport, journalists and the media and obviously a social media companies as well, and the rest of us to just think about the kind of country we wa nt to think about the kind of country we want to live in, the way that we speak to each other, the way we treat each other, it will only change if we have societal change and everybody takes their part in making things better and that is not to say we can't disagree. of course we will disagree on issues but we have to do that in a respectful manner, with compassion and understanding and as you quite rightly say, focusing on the things asjo said in her maiden speech that we have in common and connecting on
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a human level sometimes, rather than just shouting at each other and focusing on the things we disagree on. the one thing we haven't mentioned yet is brexit and we have to, because it is absolutely what everybody is concerned with at the moment. and ijust wonder, we have been talking about the language used in parliament and there was that moment borisjohnson said the greatest thing that he could do as far as greatest thing that he could do as farasjo greatest thing that he could do as far asjo legacy greatest thing that he could do as far as jo legacy was to greatest thing that he could do as far asjo legacy was to do was to get brexit done. how uncomfortable we re get brexit done. how uncomfortable were you with that? that evening in parliament was particularly uncomfortable and very upsetting for ourfamily, my uncomfortable and very upsetting for our family, my parents uncomfortable and very upsetting for ourfamily, my parents particularly found it very difficult, and i think that comment was part of a bigger not very pleasant debate that took place in parliament that evening. i think, for me, what happened tojo should never be forgotten, she was murdered in the street, and politicians all need to remember that, we all need to remember that and we can probably all hopefully agree we don't want to live in a country where that sort of thing happens, but what i don't want is jo's name to be used for political
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point scoring or indeed to silence debate and discussion. joe is an advocate of passionate, robust debates and we live in a country where we are proud to have those things that can take place. i think the heated moments of parliament, andindeed the heated moments of parliament, and indeed pubs and indeed elsewhere, sometimes i think it's important for us to all step back and think about the language we use, the tone we use, and that includes leaders in politics and i would say that as the prime minister, the leader of the opposition and others. they have a responsibility to speak and to behave responsibly as well.” wish you well with your work, your campaign, and it's really good to talk to you, thank you very much for your time. you are watching afternoon light. we will look at what is happening across the nation is in bbc nationwide injust a moment, but first the weather with darren. still one or two showers around through the rest of the day but most places are going to be drive. not sunny everywhere, mind you, still quite a lot of cloud across parts of north wales, the
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north midlands, heading up into northern england, one or two showers for south wales and southern england and may one or two showers across the far north—east of scotland too. temperatures 14 to 16 degrees to end the afternoon. also some rain coming up the afternoon. also some rain coming up from the atlantic so any showers will fade away ahead of that, we have this patchy rain coming in from the west, probably where the hills of western scotland and down towards the south coast of england where the winds will pick up a bit as well. i of it, though, a little chilly, and that band of cloud and patchy rain will continue northwards and eastwards tomorrow, clearing the way from eastern england by the end of the morning into the afternoon, lingering in the north—east of scotland. rain threatens to come back to the south—east corner but many places dry, quite sunny in the afternoon, just one or two showers and to the north—west and those temperatures again near normal for 02:30:49,394 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 the time of year.
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