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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 11, 2017 5:45am-6:01am GMT

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stronger place" than it was eight years ago. the times reports uk labour leaderjeremy corbyn has backed a plan to limit pay at companies with government contracts and has proposed increasing income tax for higher earners. the ft says deutsche bank is turning to social media feeds such as twitter to find promising millennials who could be persuaded to consider a career in finance. the gulf news carries the decision by fifa to expand the world cup to 48 teams by 2026. president gianni infantino sais, "we have to shape the world cup of the 21st century." and finally, do you suffer noisy conversations from office colleagues you wish you could somehow switch off? well the newly invented hushme could be your salvation. resembling a pair of headphones the device covers a persons mouth and cancels out all noise while letting the wearer to continue to talk and listen on the phone. we can't do that on the tv. u nfortu nately, if we we can't do that on the tv. unfortunately, if we had aaron heslehurst, we could try it on him. i was thinking of various presenters, but anyway. joining us is james hughes who's chief market analyst at brokerage firm gkfx.
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possibly, whenever an american leader speaks and isn't announcing policy, people hear what they want to hear. republicans will be like, we have heard it before. democrats will be saying, you were great. democrats were sitting there saying that because what their view is of what is to come is one of the biggest issues. barack obama's speech was always going to be about some of the enormous things he has accomplished in his time as residency. most notably of course being the first black president was a history making event —— presidency. there was a lot of focus on how well he has done, the fight against terrorism, the economy. there is no argument that of course, with the economy, there has been a huge turnaround, and such a change in eight years. and if we remember
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what he inherited, an economy on the verge of another great depression, and absolutely dire state. it is and just him that turned it around. it was a team effort. and the natural course of time turns things around, so course of time turns things around, so you could argue anyone sitting at the helm, if you waited long enough, things would turn around. there are a lot of things he hasn't done. you can't get away from the criticism of barack obama, which has been he has beena barack obama, which has been he has been a president with so many promises that hasn't necessarily brought many to the front, and one of the big things, the massive things, one was gun control, which he hasn't been able to do, and secondly, they probably tie into each other, the fact he wanted to change how washington worked, he wanted to change the red tape and how easy it was to push these skills through. and of course he has found, like so many others before him, that once you get into power it is so much more difficult to get things
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done than it looks from the outset. and we wonder whether that will be different this time around because the republicans have the majority in both houses? donald trump has used the phrase on the drained swamp, and it remains to be seen. there is so much self interest. every democratic government that has a civil service thatis government that has a civil service that is always there despite whichever party is in power, they are the ones running the day—to—day business and they don't want things to change. there is so much self—interest. to change. there is so much self-interest. with donald trump, yes, he holds the majority, but he doesn't necessarily have full support from a lot of republicans, thatis support from a lot of republicans, that is an issue that goes with that. from barack obama, what was interesting was a real focus on the fa ct of interesting was a real focus on the fact of the younger generation, on millennial is, on the fact of climate change and the economy and race. it was all focused on the
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younger generation. those democrat vote rs younger generation. those democrat voters who are disillusioned from what they see now, it was important for him to really try to build, well, maybe set things forward, to bea well, maybe set things forward, to be a little bit easier for those younger people, the younger voting democrats. do you remember who he took overfrom, democrats. do you remember who he took over from, eight years ago? george bush. and where is he now? he disappeared from public view. barack obama said he won't do that. he said, i will be with you every step of the way our until the end of my days. it will be interesting to see how he participates in american society. or is it a run-up to get michelle ready for the presidency? she said she definitely doesn't want it. definitely. i don't she said she definitely doesn't want it. definitely. idon't know. with bill and hillary you knew that she a lwa ys bill and hillary you knew that she always wanted the job but with michelle... i am always wanted the job but with michelle... iam not always wanted the job but with michelle... i am not so sure. let's
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talk about the main opposition in the uk. to international viewers it might not be a figure they are interested in but jeremy might not be a figure they are interested in butjeremy corbyn, the labour leader, doing his speech for the new year, various elements in it, the guardian picked up on the elements about fatcat pay. international viewers mightn't be familiar. if he goes this way i don't think they will become used to him. he had a car crash mourning yesterday. there were so many different things he said, he contradicted himself three times on various issues. one of the big things was this on fatcat pay. we we re things was this on fatcat pay. we were talking about this last week, the ftse 100 ceos were talking about this last week, the ftse 100 ceos making £5 million a year on average. we have the story last week that on tuesday or wednesday... wednesday afternoon, they have earned the average wage. ftse 100 bosses aren't the average wage of a worker for the entire year
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in three days. the phrase would have jumped out that everyone around the world, maximum wage. how can you impose a maximum wage in a market economy? that is the absolute point. how can these things be enforced? there are a lot of labour mps and supporters... ok, we look at the wages and we say it is ridiculous, look at what football players own, look at what football players own, look at what ftse 100 ceos own. —— earn. jeremy tilse and said there is a lot of support for capping higher p5y~ a lot of support for capping higher pay. i can perfectly understand. to make it clear, he wasn't suggesting it across all companies, those with government contracts, where the government contracts, where the government can influence what bosses are paid. interestingly, deutsche bank scouring social media to assess who they should hire in future, and it is the prospect of a massive wage
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packet that attracts people. it is the prospect of a massive wage packet that attracts peoplem it is the prospect of a massive wage packet that attracts people. it is the only thing that will attract people to deutsche bank, the bonuses and money. that is why this country is so massive with investment banking. a lot of it is to do with money. what is it about? link in? i think it is new. if you apply for a job, we know that your prospective employer will look your media profile. now they do it before, they are looking for people on social media and then they come to you and say, it is a lovely place to work. media and then they come to you and say, it is a lovely place to worklj wish they would come along and say that. don't say that! the fact is, this is the other side of things. before everyone says, be careful what you write on social media will stop if you try for a job, you might not get it. this is a fact of going towards it and focusing on getting
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people ready for careers in different areas. ok, so some teams who would have qualified for the last world cup under the scheme fifa wa nts to last world cup under the scheme fifa wants to introduce, qatar, omagh, jordan, senegal, iceland, these teams were not in the world cup, would you like to see them in there? —— oman. it is a lot of teams. my wife would argue that the world cup is long enough. i think it will be the same duration. more groups and games. what's interesting of course is the growth of football in not just europe and south america as he said yesterday. it isn't those areas where the growth is. the growth is in the fareast, where the growth is. the growth is in the far east, the middle east, africa. that is where there is so much growth. and by excluding those countries because they don't have the infrastructure to put the teams into the world cup, or get so good in that area to qualify, you are excluding a lot of paying tv
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audiences from watching the world cup. all of the money. that is what fifa is about, the money. who would you give one of these gadgets in your trading floor? i think they would give it to one —— i think they would give it to one —— i think they would give it to one —— i think they would give one to me. the hushme. i can think of a lot of people, and my wife and children would give it to me. could you imagine married couples, buying and hushme for christmas? it will retail for less than $200 us, just amazing. christmas? it will retail for less than $200 us, just amazinglj christmas? it will retail for less than $200 us, just amazing. i can do it with my children for half an hour out of time, shout as loud as you carl. out of time, shout as loud as you can. james hughes, thank you very much indeed. we enjoyed your company. and thank you to for your company. and thank you to for your company. we will see you soon. goodbye. hello. before our weather turns increasingly wintry, it turns wild and windy. a particularly lively day across the northern half of the uk today. some travel disruption is possible
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as wee see wind gusts in excess of 60mph. strongest winds through northern scotland as this weather feature pushes east, introducing cold winds across the country and keeping the wind lively and gusty for the morning rush—hour. gusts in excess of 60mph across parts of scotland. frequent showers turning frequently to sleet and snow notjust over the hills. rain showers for northern ireland accompanies the strong to gale force winds, gales if not severe gales for some parts of northern and western england, as well as western wales. not a great morning rush hour across the pennines. to go with showers, the winds particularly lively. further south and east, the wind isn't as strong, but picking up through the day, introducing some sunshine but dropping the temperature. feeling colder for all in the afternoon. showers most frequent in the north—west of england and ireland, and they turn increasingly to snow across scotland with afternoon temperatures at three or four degrees at best. we continue with those winds, strong, gusty and increasingly icy through the night and into thursday. the showers get increasingly wintry too. scotland, northern ireland and northern england have a covering of snow for some into the morning, certainly icy conditions around. further south, even here a cold start to thursday. here is the set up for thursday, with the north—westerly winds
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bringing increasingly cold and arctic air our way. notice the weather feature pushing south, this could complicate things, the forecast for the south for sure. uncertainty at the moment but it looks like for southern areas outbreaks of rain with the wind coming from the south—west, but the rain turning to snow for a time across the welsh mountains, the moors, the south—west and the other high ground, moving to the other parts of southern england as we go through the afternoon, giving a covering here and there, maybe some flakes to low levels, certainly one to watch. further north we go, though, it's a case of some avoiding the showers altogether, others frequent snow showers. a good covering over the high ground in scotland, 10—20 centimetres if not more for the highlands and grampians. covering of snow to lower levels at times. even if you miss the showers, some of you will completely, all of you will notice the wind, it is going to be a day where the wind chill makes it feel much more like subzero for almost all. and the icy winds continue through thursday night and into friday.
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strengthening in fact across southern areas. showers for a time dying back to the coast through friday itself but the rain, sleet and snow flurries across eastern parts of england are only part of the story. here we will see severe gales on friday, some rough seas and the risk of some minor coastal flooding. stay tuned to the forecast. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. president obama says farewell to the american people. in his final speech as president, he warned of threats to democracy from inequality and racism — but after eight years in charge, says he's leaving the united stated "better and stronger". yes we can. yes we did. yes we can. good morning, it's wednesday, the 11th of january.
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also this morning: a 15—year—old girl is charged with the murder of 7—year—old katie rough in york. a warning from the royal college of physicians that lives
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